excitation-contraction coupling


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excitation

an act of irritation or stimulation; a condition of being excited or of responding to a stimulus; the addition of energy, as the excitation of a molecule by absorption of photons.

excitation-conduction-contraction
in the stimulation of muscle contraction this is the coupling which occurs at the sarcolemma-sarcoplasmic reticulum junction. Mediated by the release of calcium ions in the aqueous sarcoplasm.
excitation-contraction coupling
conversion of an excitation stimulus into contraction of the effector muscle fiber; ionic calcium is the link between the two.
indirect excitation
electrostimulation of a muscle by placing the electrode on its nerve.
excitation-secretion
in the stimulation of muscular contraction this is the stimulation of secretion of acetylcholine from the vesicles in the cholinergic nerve terminals into the synaptic cleft at the nerve-muscle junction.
excitation signs
see irritation nervous signs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, Tarnopolsky [43] reported that caffeine delayed the fatigue in human muscle during low-frequency stimulation, demonstrating an impact of caffeine on excitation-contraction coupling.
Due to non-genomic rapid increases in intracellular calcium levels and increased mobilisation of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, testosterone may reduce or protect against impaired excitation-contraction coupling during repeated high-intensity muscle contraction.
2:10 "Influence of IGF-1 supplementation on cardiac excitation-contraction coupling in diabetes.
Several mechanisms, such as neuromuscular propagation, excitation-contraction coupling, intracellular regulation, might be responsible for the decreases observed in evoked contractions and MVC (Bigland-Ritchie, 1984; Hill et al.
1:30 "Characterization of excitation-contraction coupling in diabetic hypertensive cardiomyopathy in adult rat ventricular myocytes," Loren Wold *, David Relling, and Jun Ren, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks.