excision


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Related to excision: excision biopsy

resection

 [re-sek´shun]
removal, as of an organ, by cutting; called also excision.
gastric resection gastrectomy.
root resection (root-end resection) apicoectomy.
transurethral resection of the prostate (transurethral prostatic resection) see transurethral resection of the prostate.
wedge resection removal of a triangular mass of tissue.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ex·ci·sion

(ek-sizh'ŭn), Avoid the misspelling exision.
1. The act of cutting out; the surgical removal of part or all of a structure or organ. Synonym(s): resection (3)
2. molecular biology a recombination event in which a genetic element is removed.
3. The enzymatic removal of a segment of a biopolymer.
Synonym(s): exeresis
[L. excido, to cut out]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

excision

Medtalk Surgical removal
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ex·ci·sion

(ek-sizh'ŭn)
1. The act of cutting out; the surgical removal of part or all of a structure or organ.
Synonym(s): resection (3) .
2. molecular biology A recombination event in which a genetic element is removed.
See also: resection
Synonym(s): exeresis.
[L. excido, to cut out]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

excision

(ek-sizh′ŏn) [L. excisio]
Enlarge picture
WIDE AND DEEP EXCISION OF SKIN AND SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUES: A treatment for melanoma
The act of cutting away or taking out. See: illustration

tangential excision

In burn management or surgery, removal of the outer layer of devitalized tissue by shaving it off at an angle. Blood loss can be a significant complication.

total mesorectal excision

Removal of the mesentery of the rectum, including its lymphoid and vascular tissue, during surgery for rectal adenocarcinoma.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

excision

Cutting off and removing completely.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

excision

the removal of a DNA fragment from a DNA molecule.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Excision

The process of excising, removing, or amputating.
Mentioned in: Herniated Disk
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ex·ci·sion

(ek-sizh'ŭn) Avoid the misspelling exision.
Act of cutting out; surgical removal of part or all of a structure or organ.
[L. excido, to cut out]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The pathologist (K.H., with 9 years of experience) reviewed the original slides from each core needle biopsy blinded to the outcome at surgical excision or extended follow-up.
In a recent study, authors reported the success rate (complete surgical excision) in the intra-operative frozen section biopsy cohort as 84.51%, with a completely excised tumor in 60 of 71 cases12.
For female patients, excision of fractures (90.50 [+ or -] 6.62) had significantly higher IKDC score than fixation (81.92 [+ or -] 9.66, t = 2.70, P < 0.01).
The same team performed the procedure on all patients and recorded the following: the radiological and pathological size of the lesions, the complete excision rate, the procedure duration, the pathological diagnosis, imaging findings before and after the procedure, and complications (allergic reaction, fainting, hematoma or seroma formation, thermal damage, wound infection, pain requiring analgesic use, delayed wound healing).
The wide excision was followed by radiotherapy (54 Gy), 2 months after the skin graft.
Objective of the study was to determine the role of needle aspiration and surgical excision in management of suppurative BCG lymphadenitis.
Flaps were the most common modality of coverage (88%) after excision of Basal Cell Carcinoma of face.
Since it is a premalignant lesion, the curative standard treatment is wide surgical excision. (6) Some authors recommended a four-quadrant biopsy technique (mapping technique) in which multiple frozen sections were performed intraoperatively in order to get negative surgical margins.
The last option was marsupialization that would allow lesion drainage without excision, but this technique is more fitted for larger lesions.
In addition, failure to recognize a bronchogenic cyst can delay definitive surgical excision, and subject patients to repeated incision and drainage procedures, as well as prolonged recurrent infections.
This risk appears to be age related and even complete cyst excision does not confer complete immunity17-,23.