exaptation


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exaptation

(ĕg′zăp-tā′shən)
n. Biology
The utilization of a structure or feature for a function other than that for which it was developed through natural selection.

ex·ap′ted adj.
ex·ap′tive adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Macroevolutionary patterns of defense and pollination in Dalechampia vines: adaptation, exaptation, and evolutionary novelty.
(2015) Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials.
They see fungibility not as an attribute of resources but as the de facto side effect of a lemonade strategy of exaptation in the face of unexpected contingencies; for these entrepreneurs, attributes arising due to adaptation within particular environments at particular points of time may then be exapted to other environments at a future date (Dew, Sarasvathy, & Venkataraman, 2004).
A character-based analysis of the evolution of jellyfish blooms: adaptation and exaptation. Hydrobiologia 616: 193-215.
However, the fact that some moral offence triggers the same facial motor activity as core disgust elicitors (Chapman, Kim, Susskind & Anderson, 2009) is not a robust corroboration of the disgust exaptation hypothesis (Rozin et al., 2009).
Pollen grains respond in the appropriate way for simple physical reasons, but their adaptive significance more correctly relates to their hydrodynamic properties, with aerodynamic benefits as, at best, an exaptation as described later.
In Johnson's view, a "good idea" springs from a set: slow hunch, liquid network, adjacent possible, error, serendipity, platform and exaptation. Both models shed light on the power-teaching prototype--itself a framework for innovative teaching and learning.
The late evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould popularized the term "exaptation" to refer to this phenomenon, expressly analogizing it to spandrels in architecture.
Whether evolutionary adaptation, spandrel, or exaptation, the positive affects of health narratives suggest that they have been around for a long time, and are quite possibly among the first "stories" we told to our family members, other tribe members, and especially ourselves.
Exaptation is the sixth circumstance of innovation.
"The specific concepts of 'exaptation' and 'ritualization' that we discuss are quite common when discussing the evolution of non-human animals," Shariff added.
For Johnson, seven factors fuel the recombination and migration that catalyze innovation: the adjacent possible, liquid networks, the slow hunch, serendipity, error, exaptation, and platforms.