necrosis

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necrosis

 [nĕ-kro´sis, ne-kro´sis] (Gr.)
the morphological changes indicative of cell death caused by enzymatic degradation.
aseptic necrosis necrosis without infection or inflammation.
acute tubular necrosis acute renal failure with mild to severe damage or necrosis of tubule cells, usually secondary to either nephrotoxicity, ischemia after major surgery, trauma (see crush syndrome), severe hypovolemia, sepsis, or burns. See also lower nephron nephrosis.
Balser's fatty necrosis gangrenous pancreatitis with omental bursitis and disseminated patches of necrosis of fatty tissues.
bridging necrosis septa of confluent necrosis bridging adjacent central veins of hepatic lobules and portal triads characteristic of subacute hepatic necrosis.
caseous necrosis caseation (def. 2).
central necrosis necrosis affecting the central portion of an affected bone, cell, or lobule of the liver.
cheesy necrosis caseation (def. 2).
coagulation necrosis death of cells, the protoplasm of the cells becoming fixed and opaque by coagulation of the protein elements, the cellular outline persisting for a long time.
colliquative necrosis liquefactive necrosis.
fat necrosis necrosis in which fat is broken down into fatty acids and glycerol, usually occurring in subcutaneous tissue as a result of trauma.
liquefactive necrosis necrosis in which the necrotic material becomes softened and liquefied.
massive hepatic necrosis massive, usually fatal, necrosis of the liver, a rare complication of viral hepatitis (fulminant hepatitis) that may also result from exposure to hepatotoxins or from drug hypersensitivity.
moist necrosis necrosis in which the dead tissue is wet and soft.
postpartum pituitary necrosis see postpartum pituitary necrosis.
selective myocardial cell necrosis myofibrillar degeneration.
subcutaneous fat necrosis of newborn a benign, self-limited disease affecting term newborns and young infants, characterized by circumscribed, indurated, nodular areas of fat necrosis. It is thought to be related to trauma on bony prominences during delivery, hypothermia, asphyxia, or maternal diabetes; it usually resolves spontaneously by 2 to 4 weeks with no scarring. Called also adiponecrosis neonatorum or subcutanea.
Zenker's necrosis hyaline degeneration and necrosis of striated muscle; called also Zenker's degeneration.

ne·cro·sis

(nĕ-krō'sis),
Pathologic death of one or more cells, or of a portion of tissue or organ, resulting from irreversible damage; earliest irreversible changes are mitochondrial, consisting of swelling and granular calcium deposits seen by electron microscopy; most frequent visible alterations are nuclear: pyknosis, shrunken and abnormally dark basophilic staining; karyolysis, swollen and abnormally pale basophilic staining; or karyorrhexis, rupture, and fragmentation of the nucleus. After such changes, the outlines of individual cells are indistinct, and affected cells may merge, sometimes forming a focus of coarsely granular, amorphous, or hyaline material.
[G. nekrōsis, death, fr. nekroō, to make dead]

necrosis

(nə-krō′sĭs, nĕ-)
n. pl. necro·ses (-sēz′)
Death of cells through injury or disease, especially in a localized area of a tissue or organ.

ne·crot′ic (-krŏt′ĭk) adj.

necrosis

Cell or tissue death due to disease, trauma, hypoxia, radiation, acute infection, etc.; the constellation of changes that accompany and follow irreversible cell injury in living organisms.

necrosis

 Pathology Cell or tissue death due to disease, trauma, hypoxia, radiation, acute infection, etc; the constellation of changes that accompany and follow irreversible cell injury in living organisms. See Acute tubular necrosis, Aseptic necrosis, Bridging necrosis, Coagulation necrosis, Colliquative necrosis, Contraction band necrosis, Cystic medial necrosis, Fat necrosis, Fibrinoid necrosis, Liquefaction necrosis, Lymph node necrosis, Osteonecrosis, Osteoradionecrosis, Papillary necrosis, Piecemeal necrosis, PORN.

ne·cro·sis

, pl. necroses (nĕ-krō'sis, -sēz)
Pathologic death of one or more cells, or of a portion of tissue or organ, resulting from irreversible damage; earliest irreversible changes are mitochondrial, consisting of swelling and granular calcium deposits seen by electron microscopy; most frequent visible alterations are nuclear pyknosis and abnormally dark basophilic staining; karyolysis, swelling and abnormally pale basophilic staining; or karyorrhexis, rupture and fragmentation of the nucleus. After such changes, the outlines of individual cells are indistinct, and affected cells may become merged, sometimes forming a focus of coarsely granular, amorphous, or hyaline material.
[G. nekrōsis, death, fr. nekroō, to make dead]

necrosis

(ne-kro'sis) ('sez?) plural.necroses [Gr. nekrosis, (state of) death]
Enlarge picture
NECROSIS: Necrotic wound of the foot
The death of cells, tissues, or organs. Necrosis may be caused by insufficient blood supply, pathogenic microorganisms, physical agents such as trauma or radiant energy (electricity, infrared, ultraviolet, roentgen, and radium rays), and chemical agents acting locally, acting internally after absorption, or placed into the wrong tissue. Some medicines cause necrosis if injected into the tissues rather than the vein, and some, such as iron dextran, cause necrosis if injected into areas other than deep muscle or vein. See: illustration; gangrene; mortificationnecrotizing (nek'ro-tiz?ing), adjective

acute esophageal necrosis

Necrotizing esophagitis.

acute tubular necrosis

Abbreviation: ATN
Acute damage to the renal tubules; usually due to ischemia associated with shock.
See: acute renal failure

anemic necrosis

Necrosis due to inadequate blood flow to a body part.

aseptic necrosis

Necrosis without infection, e.g., as a result of trauma or drug use.

avascular necrosis

Osteonecrosis.

Balser fatty necrosis

See: Balser fatty necrosis

caseous necrosis

Necrosis with soft, dry, cheeselike formation, seen in diseases such as tuberculosis or syphilis. Synonym: cheesy necrosis

central necrosis

Necrosis that affects only the center of a body part.

cheesy necrosis

Caseous necrosis.

coagulation necrosis

Necrosis occurring esp. in infarcts. Coagulation occurs in the necrotic area, converting it into a homogeneous mass and depriving the organ or tissue of blood.
Synonym: fibrinous necrosis; ischemic necrosis

colliquative necrosis

Necrosis caused by liquefaction of tissue due to autolysis or bacterial putrefaction. Synonym: liquefactive necrosis

dry necrosis

Dry gangrene.

embolic necrosis

Necrosis due to an embolic occlusion of an artery.

fat necrosis

Necrosis of fatty tissues, seen, for example, in patients with severe cases of pancreatitis.

fibrinous necrosis

Coagulation necrosis.

focal necrosis

Necrosis in small scattered areas, often seen in infection.

gummatous necrosis

Necrosis forming a dry rubbery mass resulting from syphilis.

ischemic necrosis

Coagulation necrosis.

liquefactive necrosis

Colliquative necrosis.

medial necrosis

Necrosis of cells in the tunica media of an artery.

moist necrosis

Necrosis with softening and wetness of the dead tissue.

postpartum pituitary necrosis

Sheehan syndrome.

putrefactive necrosis

Necrosis due to bacterial decomposition.

radiation necrosis

Necrosis caused by radiation exposure.

subcutaneous fat necrosis of newborn

An inflammatory disorder of unknown cause affecting fat tissue that may occur in the newborn at the site of application of forceps during delivery and occasionally in premature infants.

superficial necrosis

Necrosis affecting only the outer layers of bone or any tissue.

thrombotic necrosis

Necrosis due to thrombus formation.

total necrosis

Necrosis affecting an entire organ or body part.

Zenker necrosis

See: Zenker, Friedrich Albert von

necrosis

The structural changes, such as those of GANGRENE, that follow death of a body tissue. The most obvious changes are in the cell nuclei which become shrunken and condensed (pyknosis) and no longer take a basic stain. Cell CYTOPLASM becomes more homogeneous and spaces (vacuoles) develop.

necrosis

the localized death of plant and animal tissue, such as the response of a leaf to invasion by a pathogen. An affected area is described as being ‘necrotic’. see DIPHTHERIA.

Necrosis

The death of cells, a portion of tissue, or a portion of an organ due to permanent damage of some sort, such as a lack of oxygen supply to the tissues.

necrosis

Death of some or all cells in an organ or tissue. The process involves swelling of the nucleus (pyknosis), fragmentation of the nucleus (karyorrhexis) and complete dissolution of the nuclear chromatin (karyolysis). Necrosis is caused by disease, trauma or interference with blood supply. There are many sequelae to ocular necrosis (e.g. inflammation, reduction in aqueous humour production following ciliary epithelium necrosis, corneal opacity following necrosis of corneal epithelial cells, and visual loss and floaters following retinal necrosis). See apoptosis; retinal necrosis.

ne·cro·sis

, pl. necroses (nĕ-krō'sis, -sēz)
Pathologic death of one or more cells, or of a portion of tissue or organ, resulting from irreversible damage.
[G. nekrōsis, death, fr. nekroō, to make dead]

Patient discussion about necrosis

Q. can necrosis in a brain tumor kill you? If so, how? husband has glioblastoma.Tumor seems under control at this point as much as they can tell but sounds like there is a lot of necrosis. He has lots of tumor progression symptoms but since he has had the tumor for so long == 6 years = I guess the necrosis is there moreso than the actual tumor == how dangerous can this be?

A. Tumors and not only in the brain tend to develop necrosis the longer they exist because the tumor cells divide so rapidly so the blood supply can't keep up with its' own cells demands, so some cells within the tumor die (therefore are seen as necrotic). This does not usually predict prognosis, but only means that the tumor is longstanding.

More discussions about necrosis