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evolution

 [ev″o-lu´shun]
the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.
convergent evolution the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environments.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ev·o·lu·tion

(ev'ō-lū'shŭn),
1. A continuing process of change from one state, condition, or form to another.
2. A progressive distancing between the genotype and the phenotype in a line of descent.
3. The liberation of a gas or heat in the course of a chemical or enzymatic reaction.
[L. e-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll out]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

evolution

(ĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən, ē′və-)
n.
1. A continuing process of change from one state, condition, or form to another.
2. Change in the genetic composition of a population during successive generations, often resulting in the development of new species. The mechanisms of evolution include natural selection acting on the genetic variation among individuals, mutation, migration, and genetic drift.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ev·o·lu·tion

(ev'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. A continuing process of change from one state, condition, or form to another.
2. A progressive distancing between the genotype and the phenotype in a line of descent.
[L. e-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll out]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

evolution

The theory that all living organisms have developed in complexity, from a simple life form. Evolution occurs by the natural selection of those who, by the fortune of spontaneous random changes (mutations), happen to be best suited to their contemporary environment, to survive and reproduce. It does not occur by the passing on to offspring of characteristics acquired during the lifetime of an individual. Characteristics are passed on by the transmission of DNA from parents to offspring and, unless mutation has occurred, this DNA is an identical copy of the DNA of preceding generations.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

evolution

an explanation of the way in which present-day organisms have been produced, involving changes taking place in the genetic make-up of populations that have been passed on to successive generations. According to DARWINISM, evolutionary MUTATIONS have given rise to changes that have, through NATURAL SELECTION, either survived in better adapted organisms (see ADAPTATION, GENETIC), or died out. Evolution is now generally accepted as the means which gives rise to new species (as opposed to SPECIAL CREATION) but there is still debate about exactly how it has taken place and how rapidly changes can take place. See LAMARCKISM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Patient discussion about evolution

Q. How the bacterias are produced?

A. The Bacteria are a large group of unicellular microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a wide range of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. (The name comes from the Greek bakterion, meaning small staff.) Bacteria are ubiquitous in every habitat on Earth, growing in soil, acidic hot springs, radioactive waste,[2] water, and deep in the Earth's crust, as well as in organic matter and the live bodies of plants and animals. There are typically 40 million bacterial cells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in a millilitre of fresh water; in all, there are approximately five nonillion (5×1030) bacteria on Earth,[3] forming much of the world's biomass.[4] Bacteria are vital in recycling nutrients, with many important steps in nutrient cycles depending on these organisms, such as the fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere and putrefaction. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacteria Hope this helps.

More discussions about evolution
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References in periodicals archive ?
A singularity that is not only evolutionarily stable but also convergence stable is said to be a continuously stable strategy (CSS) and will represent a stable endpoint of evolution.
Conservation group EDGE, which stands for Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered was set up to raise awareness of the world's most endangered species.
The EDGE of Existence program focuses exclusively on animals that are "Evolutionarily Distinct & Globally Endangered"--species that have few close relatives, are genetically distinct, and are extremely endangered.
What we think of as emotional behavior may be the result of "evolutionarily old" mechanisms winning out over areas of the brain that developed later in the course of human evolution, argues psychologist Jonathan D.
Lopez's is a portrait of elements too powerful to stop but too dumb to realize that they're evolutionarily screwed.
One could argue it has nothing to do with religion, that it is evolutionarily derived.
157-58): (1) with regard to freedom, our actions are not determined by our evolutionary inclinations, (2) we sin "because we have natural, evolutionarily necessary desires that may become inordinate, especially in environments different from that in which our ancestors evolved," (3) "Charity is not natural to us, although it can arise in us by naturalistic means.
Hawkins focuses mainly on the cortex, the most evolutionarily recent part of the brain.
They focused on the prefrontal cortex, which they noted is ''evolutionarily most developed in primates and supports higher cognitive functions,'' and found the same areas were active when both species sorted graphic figures on computer screens.
They theorize that cortisol (the body's stress hormone) is a major culprit in directing fat to the abdomen, and evolutionarily speaking, the body is programmed to get its energy primarily by pouring sugar (in the form of glucose) into the bloodstream to handle stressful situations.
Interestingly, only strategies corresponding to a Nash equilibrium, the fundamental concept of noncooperative game theory, have been found to be evolutionarily stable.
Hence we know that TFT is evolutionarily stable and is successful because it is nice (never the first to defect), retaliatory (it will defect in period t + 1 if its partner defects in t), and forgiving (it will return to cooperation in t + 1 if its partner cooperated in t).

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