eviscerate

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eviscerate

(ĭ-vĭs′ə-rāt′)
v. eviscer·ated, eviscer·ating, eviscer·ates
v.tr.
1. To remove the entrails of; disembowel.
2. Medicine
a. To remove the contents of (an organ).
b. To remove an organ, such as an eye, from (a patient).
v.intr. Medicine
To protrude through a wound or surgical incision.

e·vis′cer·a′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
To our knowledge, this is the first case report that describes a vaginal approach for treatment of dehiscence with prolonged bowel evisceration and possible obstruction.
Typically, the vaginal route is reserved either for cases that do not involve bowel evisceration or when evisceration is diagnosed immediately before bowel ischemia or sepsis occurs [11].
(1) Vaginal cuff dehiscence with evisceration can be managed successfully via a vaginal approach even with prolonged exposure of the bowel to vaginal flora.
His current thinking examines how the genocidal logics of social liquidation, cultural extermination, physiological evisceration, and racist terror become normalized features of everyday life, particularly in the "post-civil rights" and "post-racial" moments.
While evisceration has been suggested as an alternative, it has not been described for multiple cases or with long-term follow-up data in birds of prey.
evisceration, enucleation, birds of prey, ocular trauma, avian, eastern screech owl, Megascops asio, great horned owl, Bubo virginianus, barred owl, Strix varia, red-tailed hawk, Buteo jamaicensis, bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus
The incidence of evisceration was 0% for robotic hysterectomy, 11.1% for RRHND.
None of these risk factors correlated with dehiscence or evisceration (P = 0.99, 0.32, 0.46, 0.32, .06, and 0.42, respectively), she said.
(4) TAWH and evisceration rarely occur after blunt trauma.
Although TAWH and evisceration are significant clinical conditions, the main factor determining mortality is the presence of additional organ injuries.
The condition was diagnosed as trauma induced omental/ intestinal evisceration and decided for surgical management.
The etiology for the present case was suspected to be a sharp object causing deep laceration over the ventral aspect and tear in abdominal wall resulting in evisceration. William et al.