evil

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evil

[AS. yfel]
An infrequently used term for disease or illness.
References in classic literature ?
These dogs are magicians and evil-doers; it is well that they should die," was the only answer vouchsafed to us.
CREON I' faith thy wit forsook thee when thou mad'st Thy choice with evil-doers to do ill.
We are evil-doers, all of us, though them as likes the easy ways generally manage to forget it."
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTIONS WEE THINKER ACROSS: 7 Retsina 9 Appal 10 Inapt 11 Quids in 12 Ali 13 Evil-doer 16 Egyptian 17 Dad 19 Marconi 21 Syria 22 Alone 23 Nomadic.
The trailer shows Phoenix as Arthur Fleck before he became an evil-doer: dancing with his mother, working as a street clown and being a victim himself, harassed and assaulted on a subway train.
Some of the translation seem discordant and incommensurable with modern conceptions of translation, he says, such as "sun" = "donkey" and "righteous and evil-doer" = "half-brick and kiln." They force modern scholars to reconsider their expectations and presupposition about what constitutes translation.
'The presence of the police dog has no doubt had a deterrent effect on the evil-doer,'said Mr Gray.
A more problematic Rosenbloom, however, shows up in a 1924 Yiddish cartoon about anti-immigration legislation titled "Evil-doer, Why Do You Beat Your Brother?" (He's the evil-doer of the title.) It's part of the new, eerily timely YIVO exhibit The Door Slams Shut: Jews and Immigration in the Face of American Reaction.
Dostoyevsky once noted, "Nothing is easier than to condemn the evil-doer, nothing is harder than to understand him".
The longest, Going Back, has Banks returning to the home he grew up in to celebrate his parents' golden anniversary, only to discover that he can't escape being a policeman when faced with an evil-doer. He also learns a few things about himself.
One of her main theses is the denial of "moral monsters." Govier asserted that one should hate the evil deed but not the evil-doer. Equating the person with his/her action is dehumanizing; a person does not lose his or her humanity just because of what he or she did.
One part of the quote in question bore a striking similarity to one uttered by the villain Bane (Tom Hardy) in 2012's "The Dark Knight Rises." Before freeing prisoners and taking over Gotham, the evil-doer delivers a powerful monologue about the people now being in charge.