evidence-based medicine


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evidence-based medicine

process and use of relevant information from peer-reviewed clinical and epidemiologic research to address a specific clinical issue, and thereby weighing the attendant risks and benefits of diagnostic tests and therapeutic measures; literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines.

evidence-based medicine

(1) The application of the best-available (i.e., most reliable) evidence gained from the scientific method to guide clinical decision-making. The most rigourous evidence comes from meta-analysis of multiple double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

(2) The use of scientific data to confirm that proposed diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are appropriate in light of their high probability of producing the best and most favourable outcome.
 
The European Society of Cardiology uses a 3-level scale for rating the level of evidence available for a given treatment.

European Society of Cardiology Levels of Evidence of clinical trials
(A) Data derived from multiple randomised clinical trials or meta-analyses.
(B) Data derived from a single randomised clinical trial or large non-randomised studies.
(C) Consensus of opinion of the experts and/or small studies, retrospective studies, registries.

evidence-based medicine

Decision-making 'The use of scientific data to confirm that proposed diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are appropriate in light of their high probability of producing the best and most favorable outcome'. See Meta-analysis.

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
The process of applying relevant information derived from peer-reviewed medical literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines

evidence-based medicine

The use of methods of medical treatment and clinical decision-making which have been rigorously tested by properly controlled research. The latter must also be exposed to peer review, publication in respected journals and free criticism before its conclusions can be adopted as a basis for practice. A journal called Evidence-Based Medicine is published jointly by the British Medical Association and the American College of Physicians.

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
Process and use of relevant information from peer-reviewed clinical and epidemiologic research to address a specific clinical issue, and thereby weighing the attendant risks and benefits of diagnostic tests and therapeutic measures; literature to address a specific clinical problem; application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine validity of information.
References in periodicals archive ?
The connection between evidence-based medicine and shared decision making.
Assessment of knowledge about Evidence-based Medicine in medical students and doctors in a Pakistani health care setting.
Evidence-Based Medicine Contributes to the Evolution of Medicine
But this does not mean that evidence-based medicine is broken; it simply lacks the needed maturity.
Global health: the importance of evidence-based medicine. BMC Medicine 2013; 11: 223.
But the question mark remains over what will happen to that admittedly small group of patients who no longer respond to those evidence-based medicines.
Evidence-based medicine focuses on a clinical topic by searching all relevant literature in the medical database.
Preventive Services Task Force has added four new experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine. New members are Linda Ciofu Baumann, Ph.D., RN, Dr.
Integrating Narrative Medicine and Evidence-Based Medicine: The Everyday Social Practice of Healing
The NCCN, an alliance of 21 leading cancer centres which work together in the development of cancer treatment guidelines, is dedicated to research that improves the quality, effectiveness and efficiency of cancer care through evidence-based medicine.
The conceptual framework of this intellectual bridge is 'evidence-based medicine', which often does not readily lend itself to being useful for suicide prevention by virtue of the complex causal pathways leading to suicidal behaviour.

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