evidence-based medicine


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evidence-based medicine

process and use of relevant information from peer-reviewed clinical and epidemiologic research to address a specific clinical issue, and thereby weighing the attendant risks and benefits of diagnostic tests and therapeutic measures; literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines.

evidence-based medicine

the practice of medicine in which the physician finds, assesses, and implements methods of diagnosis and treatment on the basis of the best available current research, the physician's clinical expertise, and the needs and preferences of the patient.

evidence-based medicine

(1) The application of the best-available (i.e., most reliable) evidence gained from the scientific method to guide clinical decision-making. The most rigourous evidence comes from meta-analysis of multiple double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

(2) The use of scientific data to confirm that proposed diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are appropriate in light of their high probability of producing the best and most favourable outcome.
 
The European Society of Cardiology uses a 3-level scale for rating the level of evidence available for a given treatment.

European Society of Cardiology Levels of Evidence of clinical trials
(A) Data derived from multiple randomised clinical trials or meta-analyses.
(B) Data derived from a single randomised clinical trial or large non-randomised studies.
(C) Consensus of opinion of the experts and/or small studies, retrospective studies, registries.

evidence-based medicine

Decision-making 'The use of scientific data to confirm that proposed diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are appropriate in light of their high probability of producing the best and most favorable outcome'. See Meta-analysis.

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
The process of applying relevant information derived from peer-reviewed medical literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines

evidence-based medicine

The use of methods of medical treatment and clinical decision-making which have been rigorously tested by properly controlled research. The latter must also be exposed to peer review, publication in respected journals and free criticism before its conclusions can be adopted as a basis for practice. A journal called Evidence-Based Medicine is published jointly by the British Medical Association and the American College of Physicians.

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
Process and use of relevant information from peer-reviewed clinical and epidemiologic research to address a specific clinical issue, and thereby weighing the attendant risks and benefits of diagnostic tests and therapeutic measures; literature to address a specific clinical problem; application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine validity of information.
References in periodicals archive ?
This era has spurred the development of critical appraisal of the medical literature and evidence-based medicine.
Kim S, Willett L, Murphy D, O ' Rourke K, Sharma R, Shea J: Impact of an evidence-based medicine curriculum on resident use of electronic resources: A randomized controlled study.
Another activity supporting the prospects of evidence-based medicine at HMC is in regard to aligning its residency program with the standards of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International (ACGME-I) in the United States.
Challenges to the practice of evidence-based medicine during residents' surgical training: A qualitative study using grounded theory.
Not surprisingly, some fear evidence-based medicine being hijacked by administrators as a way to cut the costs of healthcare.
Evidence-based medicine converts the abstract exercise of reading and appraising the literature into the pragmatic process of using the literature to benefit individual patients while simultaneously expanding the clinician's knowledge base to make a wise patient care management decision.
Without arguing "against" evidence-based medicine, we would like to suggest four boundaries that define its current limits.
Consortiums of large employers may have the staff and the market power necessary to evaluate the quality of health-care plans and to bargain for greater commitments to patient safety and evidence-based medicine.
asks Ray Moynihan, an Australian journalist on the evidence-based medicine beat.
Safford, with the University of Alabama's Division of Preventive Medicine, cautioned that patient populations in studies used for evidence-based medicine may be different from those in many office practices, in terms of patients' attitudes, beliefs and ability to afford care.
Several major organizations use evidence-based medicine to generate practice guidelines.

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