evidence-based medicine

(redirected from evidence of clinical efficacy)

evidence-based medicine

process and use of relevant information from peer-reviewed clinical and epidemiologic research to address a specific clinical issue, and thereby weighing the attendant risks and benefits of diagnostic tests and therapeutic measures; literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines.

evidence-based medicine

(1) The application of the best-available (i.e., most reliable) evidence gained from the scientific method to guide clinical decision-making. The most rigourous evidence comes from meta-analysis of multiple double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

(2) The use of scientific data to confirm that proposed diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are appropriate in light of their high probability of producing the best and most favourable outcome.
 
The European Society of Cardiology uses a 3-level scale for rating the level of evidence available for a given treatment.

European Society of Cardiology Levels of Evidence of clinical trials
(A) Data derived from multiple randomised clinical trials or meta-analyses.
(B) Data derived from a single randomised clinical trial or large non-randomised studies.
(C) Consensus of opinion of the experts and/or small studies, retrospective studies, registries.

evidence-based medicine

Decision-making 'The use of scientific data to confirm that proposed diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are appropriate in light of their high probability of producing the best and most favorable outcome'. See Meta-analysis.

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
The process of applying relevant information derived from peer-reviewed medical literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines

evidence-based medicine

The use of methods of medical treatment and clinical decision-making which have been rigorously tested by properly controlled research. The latter must also be exposed to peer review, publication in respected journals and free criticism before its conclusions can be adopted as a basis for practice. A journal called Evidence-Based Medicine is published jointly by the British Medical Association and the American College of Physicians.

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
Process and use of relevant information from peer-reviewed clinical and epidemiologic research to address a specific clinical issue, and thereby weighing the attendant risks and benefits of diagnostic tests and therapeutic measures; literature to address a specific clinical problem; application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine validity of information.
References in periodicals archive ?
The strong multidimensional evidence of clinical efficacy in the phase 2 study was supported mechanistically by analysis of skin biopsies obtained on study days 1, 15, and 85.
In the recently concluded Phase 1b study in patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, ASN002, dosed at 40 and 80 mg once daily, was well tolerated and showed clear evidence of clinical efficacy per EASI score and rapid symptom improvement, with significant reduction in patient-reported itch as early as day 2.
Under the initial study, the company will focus on dose optimisation in the treatment of newly-diagnosed patients with glioblastoma multiforme; adaptive study design will then seek to provide definitive evidence of clinical efficacy
Study commencement follows a successful meeting with US Food & Drug Administration in September 2017, and approval by Western Institutional Review Board in November 2017 Initial focus will be on dose optimization in the treatment of newly-diagnosed patients with glioblastoma multiforme; adaptive study design will then seek to provide definitive evidence of clinical efficacy. GDC-0084 is being developed for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most aggressive form of primary brain cancer.
The promise of spinal non-fusion technologies, while initially large during its infancy, has tapered somewhat with challenges developing in specific non-fusion device segments due to insufficient evidence of clinical efficacy. Currently, total disc replacement (TDR) represents the most frequently performed spinal non-fusion surgery.
[USPRwire, Sun Apr 03 2016] The promise of spinal non-fusion technologies, while initially large during its infancy, has tapered somewhat with challenges developing in specific non-fusion device segments due to insufficient evidence of clinical efficacy. Currently, total disc replacement (TDR) represents the most frequently performed spinal non-fusion surgery.
Hassanein, "Randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled double-blind study of dextrose prolotherapy for osteoarthritic thumb and finger (DIP, PIP, and trapeziometacarpal) joints: evidence of clinical efficacy," Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, vol.
NICE advises against using antipsychotics for treating GAD in primary care, because the evidence of clinical efficacy is weak.
NICE advises against using antipsychotic agents for treatment of GAD in primary care, because the evidence of clinical efficacy is weak and the risk of serious side effects is well established.
Panelists unanimously agreed that the studies presented by the company demonstrated the ability of the drug to lower liver iron concentration (LIC), a reflection of total body iron stores, in patients over a 1-year period, providing evidence of clinical efficacy.
The CHMP Rapporteurs, SAG and the CAT concluded that data from three Glybera clinical trials demonstrated meaningful evidence of clinical efficacy, without any major safety concerns.
Despite the widespread use of the juice of the cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) to prevent UTIs, and the existence of a plausible mechanism of action, evidence of clinical efficacy remains limited.

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