evacuator


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e·vac·u·a·tor

(ē-vak'yū-ā-tŏr),
A mechanical evacuant; an instrument for the removal of fluid or small particles from a body cavity, or of impacted feces from the rectum.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

e·vac·u·a·tor

(ē-vak'yū-ā-tŏr)
A mechanical evacuant; an instrument for the removal of fluid or small particles from a body cavity, or of impacted feces from the rectum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

evacuator

(ē-văk′ū-ā-tor)
A device for emptying, as the bowels, or for irrigating the bladder and removing calculi.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Residual blood was removed from the posterior fornix, the smoke evacuator was deactivated, the dispersive pad and speculum were removed, and the patient was assisted in getting up from the table.
A smoke evacuator filtered the generated plume at the operative site.
After undertaking a literature review I believe that every theatre should have a smoke evacuator and it should become mandatory for every operation which uses diathermy or laser.
While the laser was treating the hair, the particle counters recorded a eightfold increase in ultrafine-particle concentrations, compared with ambient room baseline; this occurred even with a smoke evacuator within 5 cm of the procedure site.
Once people became aware of these hazards it was increasingly obvious the one smoke evacuator machine in the department was not enough.
For example, after firing you're supposed to slide back the bore evacuator, inspect for damage and then clean, clean, clean!
Box 3 Precautions for the Mouth Prop (1,11) * Plastic evacuator tips should not be used for office fabrication due to possible splintering.
The engine is fitted with a Donaldson dry-type air cleaner with centrifugal precleaner, replaceable primary element, safety element and automatic dust evacuator with restriction indicator filters engine intake air.
During LHR, the portable condensation particle counters documented an eightfold increase, compared with the ambient room baseline level of ultrafine particle concentrations (ambient room baseline, 15,300 particles per cubic centimeter [ppc]; LHR with smoke evacuator, 129,376 ppc), even when a smoke evacuator was in close proximity (5.0 cm) to the procedure site.
Ogg: While the use of a N95 filtering face piece respirator may seem like a less costly alternative to a smoke evacuator and the capture equipment, there are costs associated with the N95 filtering face piece respirators such as the higher price of this type of respiratory protection, fit testing before use, and training to use the respirator properly.