eutrophication


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eutrophication

 [u″tro-fĭ-ka´shun]
the accidental or deliberate promotion of excessive growth (multiplication) of one kind of organism to the disadvantage of other organisms in the same ecosystem.

eutrophication

(ū-trŏf″ĭ-kā′shŭn) [Gr. eutrophein, to thrive]
Alteration of the environment by increasing the nutrients required by one species to the disadvantage of other species in the ecosystem, esp. in an aquatic environment.

eutrophication

a process by which pollutants cause a body of water to become over-rich in organic and mineral nutrients, so that algae, CYANOBACTERIA and other microorganisms grow rapidly and deplete the oxygen supply.
References in periodicals archive ?
A general conceptual model advanced for eutrophication of shallow mid-Atlantic coastal bays predicts a shift in plant dominance through time from seagrasses and perennial macroalgae to ephemeral, bloom-forming macroalgae and epiphytes (Figure 2) (McGlathery et al., 2007).
Terrestrial eutrophication means a state of increased nutrient availability in soil as a result of input of plant nutrients.
The most common use of the term eutrophication is related to inputs of mineral nutrients, primarily nitrogen and phosphorus, to coastal waters.
Eutrophication may be defined as the sum of the effects of the excessive
The increase in nutrients in lakes ultimately cause the eutrophication is anthropogenic, and a result of increasing population (for instance, more agricultural and urban waste runoff).
They found that the European Union (EU) drives the largest global non-food eutrophication displacements, to the Asia-Pacific region for marine eutrophication and to Africa for freshwater eutrophication.
The forestry department said that, in cooperation with the WDD, they will carry out further analyses to examine the effects of eutrophication on the quality of the lake water.
These increased anthropogenic activities have increased the N deposition rate and aggravated eutrophication [26-39].
According to the paper, uniform adoption of NRDs across the countries they studied would lead to 0.19-0.53 gigatons fewer of carbon equivalent emissions, between 4.32 and 10.6 gigatons less of phosphate (the main culprit behind eutrophication) and between 1.5 and 2.8 million square kilometers (0.6-1.08 million square miles) lesser agricultural land.
However, quantitative analyses of the effects of high crop yield and high nutrient use efficiency on coastal eutrophication are lacking.
Changes in coastal diatom species assemblages from sediment sequences have been successfully used to study, e.g., the eutrophication and changes in turbidity, salinity and freshwater input, and the possible reasons for the observed palaeoenvironmental changes (Battarbee 1986; Cooper et al.