euthanasia


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Related to euthanasia: Animal euthanasia

euthanasia

 [u″thah-na´zhah]
1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease. In recent years the concept has been broadened to include the practice of withholding extraordinary means or “heroic measures,” and thus allowing the patient to die (see extraordinary treatment). A distinction was traditionally made between positive or active euthanasia, in which there is the deliberate ending of life and an action is taken to cause death in a person, and negative or passive euthanasia, which is the withholding of life-preserving procedures and treatments that would prolong the life of one who is incurably and terminally ill and could not survive without them. However, now all euthanasia is generally understood to be active, and so the more accurate term forgoing life-sustaining treatment is replacing passive euthanasia. See also advance directives.
voluntary euthanasia see assisted suicide.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū-thă-nā'zē-ă),
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

(yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.
The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death a patient suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications—e.g., narcotics or barbiturates—to a terminally ill patient at his/her own request, to end life

euthanasia

Medical ethics The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death, a Pt suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications–eg narcotics or barbiturates to an terminally ill Pt at the Pt's own request, to end his/her life. See Advance directive, DNR, Initiative 119, Kevorkian, Physician-assisted suicide, Slow code, Social euthanasia.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease, intended as an act of mercy.
2. A quiet, painless death.
Synonym(s): man-made death (1) .
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

Mercy killing.

euthanasia

the act of painless killing to relieve human suffering from an incurable disease.

Euthanasia

The act of putting a person or animal to death painlessly or allowing them to die by withholding medical services, usually because of a painful and incurable disease. Mercy killing is another term for euthanasia.
Mentioned in: Bereavement, Suicide

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the fact that a lot of developed countries have accepted the practice of euthanasia legally and socially, I believe it is morally wrong.
Wim Distelmans, a doctor who chairs Belgium's euthanasia regulatory commission, defended the three doctors.
A paper-based, semi-quantitative descriptive study design was used to assess the views of third- to fifth-year medical students at Stellenbosch University on euthanasia and PAS in SA.
The Supreme Court said 'living will' would be permitted only after obtaining permission from the family members of the person who had sought passive euthanasia and also from a team of expert doctors who had reached conclusion that the said patient could not be revived.
A senior health ministry official said the redrafted bill does not encourage active euthanasia.
In other practices, there may be a lack of understanding the holistic nature of euthanasia. Some pain with injection cannot be eliminated, yet one can choose the best route of administration to minimize this.
Euthanasia is not a substitute for Palliative Care.
Euthanasia commission head Wim Distelmans said the teenager was "nearly 18".
It is the only country with no age barrier on euthanasia.
" Active euthanasia has not been recommended in The Medical Treatment of Terminally Ill patients ( protection of patients and medical practitioners) Bill.
Question: What is your practice's policy regarding euthanasia? Is there a protocol that you follow?
The 'sacred' value of autonomy in euthanasia and assisted suicide is not absolute, because people change their minds--while passing enabling laws 'holds grave consequences' for both individuals and society.