eutelegenesis

eu·tel·e·gen·e·sis

(yōō-tĕl′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
Artificial insemination by semen from a donor selected because of certain desirable characteristics for the development of superior offspring.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sherman discussed briefly the benefits of germinal choice with benefits extending beyond the infertile couple to "fertile couples wishing to improve upon the genetic constitution of their offspring." (37) The term for this practice was "eutelegenesis" a word coined in 1935 by Herbert Brewer writing in Eugenics Review.
Certainly, the many genesis stories Squier tells - of eutelegenesis (artificial insemination), penectogenesis (an early term for IVF) and ectogenesis - tempt the feminist analyst to reach for generalizations, for a theory that grapples with "the deepest fears and wishes of our cultural unconscious: the fear of female procreative dominance, and the male wish to usurp and monopolize reproductive power." Yet the very richness of Squier's material reveals the flattening effect of such sweeping explanations, which reinstall reproduction within a timeless, primordial frame.