eustachian


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eu·sta·chian

(yū-stā'shăn), There is no historical or phonetic basis for the pronunciation ū-stā'shun.
Described by or attributed to Eustachio.

eu·sta·chian

(yū-stā'-shē-an)
Described by or attributed to Bartolomeo Eustachio (1524-1574); usually referring to the pharyngotympanic (auditory) tube.

eustachian

(u-sta'ke-an) (-shen)
[Bartolomeo Eustachio (Eustachi), It. anatomist, 1520–1574]
Pert. to the auditory tube.
See: ear; eustachian tube
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of nasal obstruction and reconstruction on the eustachian tube.
The eustachian tube is the body's natural mechanism for clearing/ equalizing air pressure.
Potential subjects were screened by phone conversation for eligibility and invited for evaluation and testing at Middle Ear and Eustachian Tube Research Center.
Pre-operative evaluation of Eustachian tube function using a modified pressure equilibration test is predictive of good postoperative hearing and middle ear aeration in type 1 tympanoplasty patients.
Conservative measures, including but not limited to intranasal steroids, treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux, and a trial of tympanostomy tubes, should be considered before eustachian tuboplasty.
But upper respiratory tract infections can cause the Eustachian tubes to become congested, which means fluids will remain trapped in the middle ear.
It read: "Celine has been dealing with a condition in her middle ear known as Patulous Eustachian tube, which causes hearing irregularities, and makes it extremely difficult to sing.
In this study, clinical investigations focused on the surgical effect of an intact canal wall mastoidectomy and mastoidectomy combined with tympanostomy tube (TT) or balloon dilation eustachian tuboplasty (BDET).
After 48 hours, a subcostal view of the inferior vena cava joining the right atrium in a second TTE detected a prominent Eustachian valve with mobile multilobulated vegetation attached (Figure 1; Supplementary Materials (available here)).
The importance of Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD) as it relates to the pathogenesis of middle ear disease and cholesteatoma cannot be overstated.
The four muscles of the soft palate (palatoglossus, palatopharyngeus, tensor veli palatini, and levator veli palatini) aid in swallowing and are critical in opening of the Eustachian tubes; thus, injury to the palatal region can impair these functions.
The effect of infection or inflammation in middle ear, nose or nasopharynx reflects Eustachian tube, so a knowledge of anatomy and physiology of it is necessary for proper diagnosis and treatment of the diseases.