eurypterid


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eurypterid

any large extinct scorpion-like aquatic arthropod of the order Eurypterida, found in the SILURIAN PERIOD.
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The presumed synziphosuran Bunodella horrida Matthew, 1889 (Silurian; Cunningham Creek Formation, New Brunswick, Canada) is a eurypterid. Journal of Paleontology, 81 (3), pp.
Such is the lot of the giant pterygotid eurypterid, the largest arthropod that ever lived.
The supposed scorpion Acanthoscorpio mucronatus Kjellesvig-Waering, recognized as a juvenile eurypterid and its implications for scorpion systematics.
If you are determined to find a eurypterid, make an appointment with Lang's Fossils in Ilion for access to their famed quarry.
A low diversity ichnofossil assemblage discovered in 1995, represented by Monomorphichnus, ?Taenidium and Helminthoidichnites, was recovered from sandstone-siltstone beds that lie above the basal vertebrate-bearing breccia and below the mudstone beds that yielded the numerous eurypterid and fish remains (Fig.
(Chelicerata: Chasmataspidida) from Lesmahagow, Scotland, and its implications for eurypterid phylogeny.
The Early Devonian Campbellton Formation in northern New Brunswick, Canada, yielded its first eurypterid fossils in 1881.
Overall, the low taxonomic diversity of the fauna combined with leperditid, lingulid and eurypterid specimens is suggestive of shallow marine, perhaps estuarine, conditions.
Along with his fellow hobbyists, Carl was on the hunt for elusive eurypterids, an extinct group of aquatic arthropods (joint-legged invertebrates) distantly related to living horseshoe crabs and scorpions.
Ancestral horseshoe crabs (Class Merostomata, Order Xiphosurida, Suborder Synziphosurina), often found associated with eurypterids in Silurian and Devonian strata, are sporadically represented in the geologic column (Stormer, 1955).
The scorpion body plan is strikingly similar to that of the extinct eurypterids (Chelicerata: Eurypterida), and on this basis, scorpions can be considered reasonable taphonomic analogues for their extinct chelicerate cousins.