euphoria

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euphoria

 [u-for´e-ah]
an exaggerated feeling of physical and mental well-being, especially when not justified by external reality. Euphoria may be induced by drugs such as opioids, amphetamines, and alcohol and is also a feature of mania. adj., adj euphor´ic.

eu·pho·ri·a

(yū-fōr'ē-ă),
1. A feeling of well-being, commonly exaggerated and not necessarily well founded.
2. The pleasure state induced by a drug or substance of abuse.
[eu- + G. pherō, to bear]

euphoria

/eu·pho·ria/ (u-for´e-ah) an exaggerated feeling of physical and mental well-being, especially when not justified by external reality.euphor´ic

euphoria

[yo̅o̅fôr′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, eu + pherein, to bear
1 a feeling or state of well-being or elation.
2 an exaggerated or abnormal sense of physical and emotional well-being not based on reality or truth, disproportionate to its cause, and inappropriate to the situation, as commonly seen in the manic stage of bipolar disorder, some forms of schizophrenia, organic mental disorders, and toxic and drug-induced states. Compare ecstasy.

eu·pho·ri·a

(yū-fōr'ē-ă)
A feeling of well-being, commonly exaggerated and not necessarily well founded.
[eu- + G. pherō, to bear]

euphoria

A strong feeling of well-being or happiness. The term is sometimes used to mean an abnormally exaggerated feeling of elation.

Euphoria

An intense feeling of elation or well-being. Many marijuana users experience temporary euphoria.
Mentioned in: Marijuana

eu·pho·ri·a

(yū-fōr'ē-ă)
1. A feeling of well-being, not necessarily well founded.
2. The pleasure state induced by a drug or substance of abuse.
[eu- + G. pherō, to bear]
References in periodicals archive ?
For three days, the jubilant nation was engulfed in a giant fiesta, as everyone - young and old, preacher and politician, woman and man - celebrated euphorically for what they had waited, fought, and shed blood for
As in many other South American countries, in Bolivia the return of democracy in 1982 was euphorically welcomed and met with high expectations.
This also means to accomplish everything carefully, with detachment and lucidity, euphorically if possible.
Euphorically experienced, this may culminate in meditative immersion and self-forgetting unio mystica; dysphorically perceived, it may lead to an experience of total abandonment, of horror vacui.
The euphorically wild crowd welcomed the New Year with aerial firing that injured more than 70 people in Karachi alone.
However, in the final session a package of agreements was proposed; it was approved and euphorically acclaimed by the assistants (http://unfccc.
I trotted euphorically class to class, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Heidegger whispering cryptically in my ear.
Although these two complementary obligations unavoidably restrict states' freedom of action in dealing with foreign investors, states were for several decades quite willing to undertake these obligations by ratifying investment treaties* During the 1990s, as the number of effective investment treaties grew into the thousands, (45) international law scholars reacted euphorically.
Huge Edna and skinny Wilbur consider themselves failures in some ways, but they're happy in their love and euphorically proud of their extraordinary daughter.
Sadly, the decade ended as tragically as it euphorically began.
Almost 17 years after the "Oslo" Declaration of Principles, with its five-year deadline for reaching a permanent status agreement, was euphorically signed on the White House lawn, why should anyone take this new "deadline" seriously or see any reason for hope in it?
Make sure passengers know the common symptoms of hypoxia and tell them to let you know if they are feeling any (assuming at that time you're alert and not already euphorically oblivious)