eukaryote


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eukaryote

 [u-kar´e-ōt]
an organism of the Eucaryotae, whose cells (eukaryotic cells) have a true nucleus that is bounded by a nuclear membrane, contains the chromosomes, and divides by mitosis. Eukaryotic cells also contain membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. Plants and animals, protozoa, fungi, and algae (except blue-green algae) are eukaryotes. Other organisms (the bacteria) are prokaryotes.

eu·kar·y·ote

(yū-kar'ē-ōt),
1. A cell containing a membrane-bound nucleus with chromosomes of DNA and proteins, generally large (10-100 mcm), with cell division involving a form of mitosis in which mitotic spindles (or some microtubule arrangement) are involved; mitochondria are present, and, in photosynthetic species, plastids are found; undulipodia (cilia or flagella) are of the complex 9+2 organization of microtubules and various proteins. Possession of an eukaryote type of cell characterizes the four kingdoms above the Monera or prokaryote level of complexity: Protoctista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, combined into the superkingdom Eukaryotae.
2. Common name for members of the Eukaryotae.
Synonym(s): eucaryote
[eu- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

eukaryote

also

eucaryote

(yo͞o-kăr′ē-ōt, -ē-ət)
n.
Any of various single-celled or multicellular organisms of the domain Eukaryota, characterized by cells that contain a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and by the occurrence of DNA transcription inside the nucleus and protein synthesis in the cytoplasm, in contrast to prokaryotes.

eu·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

eu·kar·y·ote

(yū-kar'ē-ōt)
1. A cell containing a membrane-bound nucleus with chromosomes of DNA, RNA, and proteins, with cell division involving a form of mitosis in which mitotic spindles (or some microtubule arrangement) are involved; mitochondria are present, and, in photosynthetic species, plastids are found. Possession of a eukaryote type of cell characterizes the four kingdoms above the Monera or prokaryote level of complexity: Protoctista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, combined into the superkingdom Eukaryotae.
2. Common name for members of the Eukaryotae.
[eu- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

eukaryote

Any organism each of whose cells contains a well defined nucleus with a nuclear membrane in which the genetic material is carried in the chromosomes. Only bacteria and blue-green algae are not eukaryotes. The word is also spelled eucaryote.
Eukaryoteclick for a larger image
Fig. 155 Eukaryote . A comparison of prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

eukaryote

or

eucaryote

any member ofa group of organisms that contains all plants, fungi and animals, but not bacteria (which are PROKARYOTES). Eukaryotes are distinguished by the fact that their cells possess a membrane-bound nucleus containing the genetic material, but there are also other differences from the prokaryotes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evolution of the eukaryote and its part in epigenetic expression of malignancy
(57) These elements are present in all prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
I elaborate on this theme of intercellular interactions, and in doing so, I characterize the implications of the endosymbiont theory in the context of the cellular mechanics of modern eukaryotes. My central premise is that the cellular and molecular natural history of modern eukaryotes will remain obscure as long as the selective forces that shaped this natural history remain unexplored (for a compelling statement of this premise, see Buss 1987).
The modern spliceosome contains some twenty paralogous Sm-domain-containing proteins, and this core complex is common to all eukaryotes and, therefore, must have been present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes.
A study of the genes underlying aging and consequent "programmed" death in the simplest unicellular eukaryotes, such as paramecia and yeast, all the way through human beings, shows that these genes are remarkably similar in every species.
The breath of oxygen ultimately spurred the evolution of complex life-forms called eukaryotes, with distinct cell nuclei and organelles.
"It's usually assumed that organisms with a nucleus cannot copy genes from different species--that's why eukaryotes depend on sex to recombine their genomes.
The work, led by Linda Amaral Zettler and Mitchell Sogin of the Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution, has also revealed completely new eukaryotes as well as others which have never been seen before in such a highly-acidic environment.
Researchers had begun to wonder if these bizarre parasites and their relatives could be living relicts of an early, pivotal time in eukaryote history.
Evidence from many sources, including DNA sequences, confirms that chloroplasts were once free-living cyanobacteria that were engulfed, but not digested, by an early eukaryote. Figure 4 shows cells of a modern cyanobacterium and chloroplasts inside plant cells.
Immunohistochemical demonstration of a lipopolysaccharide in the cell wall of a eukaryote, the green alga, Chlorella.
The new find has "genes that might provide a very good starting point to becoming eukaryote," says James Mclnerney of the National University of Ireland Maynooth.