eugenics

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eugenics

 [u-jen´iks]
the study and control of procreation as a means of improving hereditary characteristics of future generations. The concept has sometimes been used in a pseudoscientific way as an excuse for unethical, racist, or even genocidal practices such as involuntary sterilization or certain other practices in Nazi Germany and elsewhere.
macro eugenics eugenics policies that affect whole populations or groups. This has sometimes led to racism and genocide, such as the Nazi policies of sterilization and extermination of ethnic groups.
micro eugenics eugenics policies affecting only families or kinship groups; such policies are directed mainly at women and thus raise special ethical issues.
negative eugenics that concerned with prevention of reproduction by individuals considered to have inferior or undesirable traits.
positive eugenics that concerned with promotion of optimal mating and reproduction by individuals considered to have desirable or superior traits.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks),
1. Practices and policies, as of mate selection or of sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
Synonym(s): orthogenics
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

(yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

[yo̅o̅jen′iks]
Etymology: Gk, eu + genein, to produce
the study of methods for controlling the characteristics of populations through selective breeding.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks)
1. Practices and policies, as in mate selection or sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

The study or practice of trying to improve the human race by encouraging the breeding of those with desired characteristics (positive eugenics) or by discouraging the breeding of those whose characteristics are deemed undesirable (negative eugenics). The concept implies that there exists some person or institution capable of making such decisions. It also implies possible grave interference with human rights. For these reasons, the principles, which have long been successfully applied to domestic animals, have never been adopted for humans except by despots such as Adolf Hitler.

eugenics

the study of ways of improving the hereditary qualities of a population (especially the human population) by the application of social controls, guided by genetical principles.

Eugenics

A social movement in which the population of a society, country, or the world is to be improved by controlling the passing on of hereditary information through mating.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
It had become a well-established fact among America's eugenists of the 1930s that typically healthy and relatively intelligent school and university students were the favoured recipients of the eugenically advantageous promotion of the nuclear family.
36) While Blacker acknowledged in this forum that among the qualities eugenists favoured in the next generation were the classical eugenic prizes of 'sound physical and mental health and good physique .
as eugenists we think it matters which types of parents have most children, and that the eugenically favoured parents are those who have qualities enabling them to establish united, healthy and happy families.
The work and career of progressive and internationally connected doctor Maurice Schalit demonstrated that Australia's mid-century eugenists were also interested in creating a socially acceptable and accessible form of eugenics for the public.
That eugenists also consistently linked personal gains to the use of eugenics throughout the 20th century is a fact which I believe has been obscured.
23) This view is clearly articulated by a number of American eugenists in the 'Summary of the discussion at the conference on education and eugenics, Hotel Delmonico, March 20th, 1937', The American Institute of Family Relations Collection.
The attempt of eugenists to woo women through contradictory positioning on the question of female emancipation is also dramatized in the second kind of nonscientific images contained in the 1926 edition of Safe Counsel, which I call the melodramatic tableau.
The text is clear that eugenic revolutions, such as birth control, should not be used as freedom from motherhood, which is "the first glorious goal for the eugenist on the negative side of the question.