eugenics

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Related to eugenically: eugenicist, eugenist

eugenics

 [u-jen´iks]
the study and control of procreation as a means of improving hereditary characteristics of future generations. The concept has sometimes been used in a pseudoscientific way as an excuse for unethical, racist, or even genocidal practices such as involuntary sterilization or certain other practices in Nazi Germany and elsewhere.
macro eugenics eugenics policies that affect whole populations or groups. This has sometimes led to racism and genocide, such as the Nazi policies of sterilization and extermination of ethnic groups.
micro eugenics eugenics policies affecting only families or kinship groups; such policies are directed mainly at women and thus raise special ethical issues.
negative eugenics that concerned with prevention of reproduction by individuals considered to have inferior or undesirable traits.
positive eugenics that concerned with promotion of optimal mating and reproduction by individuals considered to have desirable or superior traits.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks),
1. Practices and policies, as of mate selection or of sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
Synonym(s): orthogenics
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

eugenics

(yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks)
1. Practices and policies, as in mate selection or sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

eugenics

The study or practice of trying to improve the human race by encouraging the breeding of those with desired characteristics (positive eugenics) or by discouraging the breeding of those whose characteristics are deemed undesirable (negative eugenics). The concept implies that there exists some person or institution capable of making such decisions. It also implies possible grave interference with human rights. For these reasons, the principles, which have long been successfully applied to domestic animals, have never been adopted for humans except by despots such as Adolf Hitler.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

eugenics

the study of ways of improving the hereditary qualities of a population (especially the human population) by the application of social controls, guided by genetical principles.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Eugenics

A social movement in which the population of a society, country, or the world is to be improved by controlling the passing on of hereditary information through mating.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their recommendation is a 'more eugenically minded--and, hence, restrictive--U.S.
Waterloo's Lightfoot and Ab) but purely to test him eugenically. In this way London restores some of the power of sexual selection to the 'fit' female, whose very name suggests that she cannot be caught unless she is willing.
(56) Since people's experience of self is always relative to their embodiment (that is, bodies and identities are mutually inhering), knowing that an aspect of one's body has been eugenically fixed by one's parents changes the relationship a person has to their body.
By the 1940s, this eugenically correct law had blocked the escape to the United States of many people who subsequently died in actions carried out according to the more activist laws of the Third Reich.
Sex offenders against children were regularly castrated to the cheers of the German public, and the eugenically "unfit" were sterilized.
I also claim that, when we begin to think about how a eugenically programmed person might be affected by the knowledge of having been so, we do not know our way about.
Huntington's disease: Do future physicians and lawyers thing eugenically? Clinical Genetics, 64(4), 327-328.
Helga, the second, is a nurse who goes to work in an institution for the "eugenically" undesirable to rescue her son from there.
Both courts acknowledge the "wrongness" of eugenically or socially motivated sterilization.
Such eugenically designed creatures literally owe their existence to the regime's dark powers.
All this is to say is that, as an empirical matter, it is not necessary to rely on either self-reporting or on eugenically distasteful sanguinity standards in order to have a valid measure of race.