eugenics

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eugenics

 [u-jen´iks]
the study and control of procreation as a means of improving hereditary characteristics of future generations. The concept has sometimes been used in a pseudoscientific way as an excuse for unethical, racist, or even genocidal practices such as involuntary sterilization or certain other practices in Nazi Germany and elsewhere.
macro eugenics eugenics policies that affect whole populations or groups. This has sometimes led to racism and genocide, such as the Nazi policies of sterilization and extermination of ethnic groups.
micro eugenics eugenics policies affecting only families or kinship groups; such policies are directed mainly at women and thus raise special ethical issues.
negative eugenics that concerned with prevention of reproduction by individuals considered to have inferior or undesirable traits.
positive eugenics that concerned with promotion of optimal mating and reproduction by individuals considered to have desirable or superior traits.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks),
1. Practices and policies, as of mate selection or of sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
Synonym(s): orthogenics
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

(yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

[yo̅o̅jen′iks]
Etymology: Gk, eu + genein, to produce
the study of methods for controlling the characteristics of populations through selective breeding.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks)
1. Practices and policies, as in mate selection or sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

The study or practice of trying to improve the human race by encouraging the breeding of those with desired characteristics (positive eugenics) or by discouraging the breeding of those whose characteristics are deemed undesirable (negative eugenics). The concept implies that there exists some person or institution capable of making such decisions. It also implies possible grave interference with human rights. For these reasons, the principles, which have long been successfully applied to domestic animals, have never been adopted for humans except by despots such as Adolf Hitler.

eugenics

the study of ways of improving the hereditary qualities of a population (especially the human population) by the application of social controls, guided by genetical principles.

Eugenics

A social movement in which the population of a society, country, or the world is to be improved by controlling the passing on of hereditary information through mating.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
This is to say that eugenical deaths happen with astonishing regularity at state run facilities in Texas and in many other states in our nation.
Laughlin, Eugenical Sterilization in the United States (Chicago: Psychopathic Laboratory of the Municipal Court of Chicago, 1922), and Eugenical Sterilization: 1926; Historical, Legal, and Statistical Review of Eugenical Sterilization in the United States (New Haven, Conn.
114) Madison Grant, Laughlin's colleague in the eugenics cause, echoed Laughlin's enthusiasm for the Nazi program and described how "'most people of our type are in sympathy with the German eugenical measures.
He seems complicit, for example, in Peirce's own explanations of his troubles, according to which something as innocent as left-handedness is linked, after the fashion of Galton's eugenical determinism, with all sorts of literally sinister traits.
War hysteria, fueled by yellow journal newspapers and eugenical publications, promoted the postwar phenomenon called the "red scare.
4) While Swithin's imagination seems to collude with eugenical ideologies that would associate higher classes with more evolved species, Swithin herself reading history on the verge of Nazi invasion resembles a mastodon contemplating the Ice Age, glimpsing the impending extinction of its kind.
39) Harry Hamilton Laughlin, White America 9 EUGENICAL NEWS 3 (1924) (reviewing Earnest Cox's book, White America).
As I argue in my book, this preoccupation is precipitated not by a sudden universal acknowledgment of the mother as archetypally and essentially primary to identity but rather by two specific historical developments: most immediately, in the early twentieth century, the eugenical discourse on race and the maternal and, more broadly, the emergent, science-inflected discourse on the body (commonly touched and nurtured by the mother initially) as a primary constituent of the subject (Bordering on the Body: The Racial Matrix of Modern Fiction and Culture, Oxford UP).
During the sixty years that it remained in force, the Virginia Statute for Eugenical Sterilization gave a legal imprimatur to over 8,300 operations.
this passage can be seen as a freighted allusion to mongolism--a mysterious condition (today known as Down's Syndrome) that Woolf indirectly invokes as a figure for the eugenical anxieties about her own fertility" (50).
misleading survey of the contents of the Eugenical News from 1932 to