eudaimonia


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eudaimonia

(ū″dī-mōn′ē-ă, dĭ) [Gr. eudaimonia, good fortune, happiness]
A sense of fulfillment that arises from achieving one's full potential as a human being.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Virtue identity is conceptually distinct from the moral identity construct: it is based on virtue ethics, which embraces the existence of an actual moral self and moral objectivism (eudaimonia as the ideal of happiness), and considers virtues as constitutive of and conducive to it through phronesis-guided action (Kristjansson, 2015, pp.
One general factor that may be connected to basic psychological needs, eudaimonia, and health or risk behaviors is subjective vitality.
This found that 34 out of 35 OECD countries now collect life evaluation data and more than three-quarters of OECD NSOs have collected at least some data on affect and eudaimonia, which follow in some respects the recommendations included in the Guidelines.
Keywords: Subjective Well-being, life evaluation, eudaimonia, Europe
Hence, the strive for a good and beautiful life connects with Aristotle's notion of eudaimonia in so far as both are an end in themselves, and education, I would argue, is both, a means to the end of living a beautiful life, but also, for many, a necessary component of a beautiful life and therefore an end in itself, as argued for by Peters.
No creo que existan grandes riesgos en proponer, en pocas palabras, que las epitomes no son obras suficientes en si mismas para alcanzar la eudaimonia, aun cuando su autor las presente como tales en su pretension de ampliar el destino de su mensaje filosofico (como lo denomina Spinelli (10)).
O ser politico, ou ser-para-a-politica aparece, inclusive, como uma das hipoteses da eudaimonia. Ao menos, caberia a politica garantir o bem humano e a eudaimonia do homem (cf.
Meaning is the other path to the good life, and it's best understood by turning to the Greek philosopher Aristotle and his concept of eudaimonia, the ancient Greek word for "human flourishing." To Aristotle, eudaimonia is not a fleeting positive emotion.
For Epicurus, the purpose of philosophy as an art of living was to achieve Eudaimonia. The Greek word Eudaimonia is often translated as 'happiness' but it literally means 'to live with one's good spirit', and 'human flourishing' has been proposed as a more precise translation (cf.