Eubacterium

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Eubacterium

 [u″bak-tē´re-um]
a genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped organisms occurring as saprophytes in soil and water. They are normal flora of the skin and body cavities and occasionally cause soft tissue infection. Species include E. alactoly´�ticum, E. len´tum, and E. limo´sum.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Eubacterium

(yū'bak-tēr'ē-ŭm),
A genus containing more than 40 species of anaerobic, non-spore-forming, nonmotile bacteria containing straight or curved gram-positive rods that usually occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Usually these organisms attack carbohydrates. They may be pathogenic, and rarely are associated with intraabdominal sepsis in humans. The type species is Eubacterium limosum.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

eubacterium

(yo͞o′băk-tîr′ē-əm)
n. pl. eubac·teria (-tîr′ē-ə)
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Eu·bac·te·ri·um

(yū'bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of anaerobic, non-spore-forming, nonmotile bacteria containing straight or curved gram-positive rods that usually occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Usually these organisms attack carbohydrates. They are often associated with mixed infections involving the abdomen, pelvis, or genitourinary tract. The type species is E. limosum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Eu·bac·te·ri·um

(yū'bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
Genus containing more than 40 species of anaerobic, non-spore-forming, nonmotile bacteria containing straight or curved gram-positive rods that usually occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Usually these organisms attack carbohydrates; may be pathogenic, but rarely are associated with intraabdominal sepsis in humans.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
16S rRNA gene sequences were amplified for each of the four samples, as well as a pooled DNA sample, using universal eubacterial 16S rRNA gene primers: 27F (5'-AGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTCAG-3') and 1492R (5'-GGTTACCTTGTTACGACTT-3').
In a study of basalt rocks lining the ocean floor, geochemists discovered that there were about 60 million archaeal and eubacterial cells per gram of rock.
Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis of PCR-amplified 16S-rDNA sequences, we characterized eubacterial community structure in soil collected on the Bloomington campus of Indiana University beneath native Canadian wildginger (Asarum canadense L.) and exotic invasive winter creeper (Euonymus fortunei (Turcz.) Hand.-Maz.).
(8) An analysis with completely sequenced genomes has shown that eukaryotic genomes result, at least in part, from a fusion between archaeal and eubacterial genomes.
Though incomplete, evidence that, for example, eubacterial flagella are related to and have evolved as secretory mechanisms (3) is compelling.
Structure-specific endonucleo-lytic cleavage of nucleic acids by eubacterial DNA polymerases, Science (1993) 260:778-783.
The results show that most eubacterial Open Reading Frames (ORFs) are preceded by a distinctly recognizable Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence pattern.
These recognize conserved regions of the eubacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene but flank hypervariable, species-specific regions.[16] The PCR reaction mixtures were electrophoretically separated and analyzed for the presence of specific amplification products.[17]
These questions had been posed previously in reference to research conducted on leaderless mRNA in a different eubacterial genus, and a list of sequenced wild type and mutant E.
"Under our hypothesis, the cytoskeleton results, like many other features, from the genetic complexity conferred by the forced integration of eubacterial genes into archaebacterial chromosomes," he says.
PCR amplification of 16S rDNA of bacterial isolate was carried out using eubacterial universal primers Gm3f and Gm4r.