etymology


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etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A likelier etymology is hence suggested by Losk Water in southern Scotland, the river Lox in Somerset and Loskey Beck in North Yorkshire.
While an etymological connection of verbs meaning die and fall is in itself possible, this etymology is difficult to combine with the fact that the original meaning of Saami *jame- 'die' is rather connected with numbness and stiffness.
Reaching a conclusion on the etymology of cholera remains intriguing.
And I shall teach the etymology of pandemonium to every new student I meet.
The lack is very evident, for instance, when they suggest a hybrid etymology which allocates one half of a word to ON and the other half to Scots and then claim that the whole word is of ON origin, as in the case of ellishon (n.) (p.
As I have suggested above, the etymology of words in this group leads us to the TEACHER directing or GUIDING the LEARNERS, rather than dragging them.
Director Megan Sandberg-Zakian, associate director of the Providence Black Rep, calls Etymology a poignant and genuine exploration of inner-city life.
Each entry presents the putative etymology of the Latin term, followed by descriptive and explanatory material drawn from Classical authors.
Packed with tips, tricks, and techniques for selecting optimum specimens and properly tending to them at home or in a greenhouse, Orchids to Know and Grow also offers an extensive selection of orchid genera, with each listing featuring a black-and-white sketch of the orchid as well as its genus, tribe, subtribe, etymology, native habitat, number of species, commonly grown species, list of what the plant hybridizes with, and its generic description, flowering season, and methods of being cultured.
Chapter ' defines the pursuit of etymology, and Chapter 2 is about the development of the discipline, and about lay theorizing.
The volume begins with explanatory notes on word etymology, usage, pronunciation, and such standards, and concludes with signs and symbols in medicine and allied fields.