etymology

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etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In due course she became by turn historian, biographer, etymologist, and versifier, all the while acting as sole editor, from 1851 to 1893, of the Monthly Packet.
To be present when Mac Low was composing, or to engage with him in conversational repartee, was to relish the knowledgeable humor of a passionate autodidact and virtuoso etymologist, spurred by the painfully compassionate social sensibilities of a political activist.
To the etymologist, Harold was a first name that fell out of use soon after the Norman Conquest and was then revived in the Victorian era; but to the local historian it is a name used in the Cotgrave area of Nottinghamshire, from the sixteenth century, in a network of families within the wider community.
Szumlas is an etymologist who studies insecticides and repellants for sand flies, mosquitoes, ants, cockroaches, the dreaded "no-seeums" and any other bug, bird, insect or animal carrying diseases that infect our troops.
That the names of numerals are not entirely symbolic and meaningless has been pointed out by the great lexicographer and etymologist, Yaska.
An etymologist will naturally be dissatisfied with vague approximations to the meaning of an isolated form that can be derived from the text and be inclined to have recourse to forms and meanings in other languages.
An etymologist has also been employed to spray against mosquitoes, which has resulted in a reduction of malaria cases in the school from 250 to just 60 cases a month.
The author of biographies and histories, he was best known for The Etymologist, a study of grammar and rhetoric.
Depending on one's interest in Vico--the humanist, legal scholar, consummate rhetorician and etymologist, historian and politician--one will find profitable insights in Mazzotta's multifaceted discussion of Vico's masterwork.
"It has left us with a rich heritage of fascinating names and hours of amusement for the amateur etymologist."
Along with this is the wider aim of providing an introduction to etymology as a discipline, and thereby addressing principles of methodology and deduction, the means by which the etymologist strives to gain his (or her) insights into the derivation of words.
For instance, Bob Stewart affords a revealing image of mid-twentieth century sexism with his account of the decision to hire an etymologist as a judge for the quiz show, "Password." The etymologist used a dictionary to check the first contested word, and thus disappointed "Password" producers, because, as Stewart says, "We could have had a girl to do that twice as fast."