etymology

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etymology

Etymology: Gk, etymos, base; L, logos, words
the study of the origin and development of words.

etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These studies have excited genealogists and etymologists, for they indicate how many distinct origins a name is likely to have.
That the names of numerals are not entirely symbolic and meaningless has been pointed out by the great lexicographer and etymologist, Yaska.
An etymologist will naturally be dissatisfied with vague approximations to the meaning of an isolated form that can be derived from the text and be inclined to have recourse to forms and meanings in other languages.
An etymologist has also been employed to spray against mosquitoes, which has resulted in a reduction of malaria cases in the school from 250 to just 60 cases a month.
The author of biographies and histories, he was best known for The Etymologist, a study of grammar and rhetoric.
Depending on one's interest in Vico--the humanist, legal scholar, consummate rhetorician and etymologist, historian and politician--one will find profitable insights in Mazzotta's multifaceted discussion of Vico's masterwork.
It has left us with a rich heritage of fascinating names and hours of amusement for the amateur etymologist.
Along with this is the wider aim of providing an introduction to etymology as a discipline, and thereby addressing principles of methodology and deduction, the means by which the etymologist strives to gain his (or her) insights into the derivation of words.
These memorable and oft-misunderstood lines of Juliet's speech(1) in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, an outpouring of romantic agony, should not be taken to mean that the versatile Bard was a flimsy etymologist oblivious to the importance of the "naming game" or the legal implications thereof.
For instance, Bob Stewart affords a revealing image of mid-twentieth century sexism with his account of the decision to hire an etymologist as a judge for the quiz show, "Password.
It was, he points out, the forerunner of today's "stigma illness" Finally, Daniel Rosenberg examines the importance of language and its social background through one individual's work, English radical and etymologist John Horne Tooke.
The individual scholars could then draw upon this vast array at will and for various purposes, including the construction of diatopic and chronologically layered vocabularies -- an aid to the etymologist and the historical novelist alike.