etymology

(redirected from etymologically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
See: ;
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, Effer (1884: 196) claims that consonant graphemes are most often reduplicated after etymologitally short vowels, whereas etymologically long vowels are usually followed by a single consonant grapheme.
In other news, Twtbuck also changed, etymologically.
Etymologically, Astasia is a Coptic word derived from the original Greek word,Aa astamata, which means to stand or to take a stand.
In this article two semantically and etymologically obscured apellatives that have spread in southern and western parts of Estonia (i.e.
Moreover, etymologically speaking, the word "animal" comprehends all living creatures, "whether brutish or human."
As yet, there has been no critical discussion of how the word "Spain" resonates etymologically both with the name "Jordan" and the nickname "rabbit." Jordan's two names (Jordan and Ingles), Maria's names (Maria and "rabbit"), and the naming of Spain are deeply interconnected.
Etymologically, these two words are the same; to include both would be a common courtesy to the reader and a sign of the willingness to overcome a particular national bent.
His talent wasn't in defining old words but in inventing new ones that were etymologically sound.
Etymologically every heir is an orphan, which is where we adoptees remain without the saving notion of chosen-ness.
Dictionaries show that, etymologically, the prefix "a" means "not, without, lacking" and theism is "belief in the existence of a god or gods." As someone who doesn't "think about" a god or gods, I am indeed "without" and therefore would fall into the category of being a-theistic.
According to the author, the Pali term bhatti and the Sansktri term bhakti are etymologically rooted to the same word "bhaj", and they give the same meaning, devotion.
Throughout the book, I especially admired its author's alertness to Milton's etymologically charged and densely enmeshed language--the interwoven vocabulary of hope (spero) and breath (spiro), for example.