etymology

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etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
To say that gunshot wound victims are objects of medical scrutiny and that the battlefield or associated field hospital is the "-arium" seems plausible but may be an etymological stretch.
French etymological prefixes, such as "con-, de-, dis-, ex-, and pre-" and French suffixes, such as "-ance, -ant, -ity, -ment, and -tion," were gradually introduced into the English language to open new word-coinage possibilities (Hsu 1990a).
Critique: Impressively well written, organized and presented, "A Historical and Etymological Dictionary of American Sign Language" is a seminal work of exceptional scholarship.
The etymological analysis of the 150 terms yielded the following results:
First, I will include an entry section of comparison of reconstructed languages according to historical linguistics, and then proceed to the main section of etymological and morphophonological comparisons of attested languages.
It is also original in its etymological discoveries and analyses of Frame's language and key themes.
While Puhvel's etymological dictionary does not have the same descriptivist goals as the CHD, it would be desirable to see it take some cues on presentation from its competitors.
In The Network, she foregrounds these intersections by interspersing etymological charts with economic histories.
When trying to clarify the etymological connection of boy with personal names, it should be mentioned that while it is not impossible for a common noun to originate from a personal name (cf.
While maintaining a rigorous standard of research, Lawtalk is also peppered with jokes, tales of etymological red herrings, and witty asides.
Carroll and Markosian identify three different approaches to characterizing metaphysics: the etymological approach (metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with a disparate collection of topics), the big-picture approach (metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with fundamental questions about the nature of reality), and the definition-by-example approach (metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with such topics as ontology, time, the Mind-Body Problem, the problem of personal identity, etc.).
We shall consider the etymological roots of such lexical items denoting female birds as hen, duck and goose scrutinised in the category DOMESTICATED BIRDS.