etiopathology

e·ti·o·pa·thol·o·gy

(ē'tē-ō-pa-thol'ŏ-jē),
Consideration of the cause of an abnormal state or finding.
[G. aitia, cause, + pathology]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

e·ti·o·pa·thol·o·gy

(ētē-ō-pă-tholŏ-jē)
Consideration of the cause of an abnormal state or finding.
[G. aitia, cause, + pathology]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The disorder affect one in every 70 boys and one in every 310 girls.2 Although, the etiopathology of ASD is not well established, the significant research has been dedicated to find out the etiological issues.
Further studies supporting this multidimensional evaluation will both shed a light on the etiopathology of the disorder as well as facilitating the treatment success.
Evidence demonstrating role of microRNAs in the etiopathology of major depression.
The etiopathology of this disease is linked to psychological and psychiatric apects in 30% of cases of patients with Psoriasis that eventually develop depression that may lead to suicide.
Although it was reported that there are many factors that cause snoring, the etiopathology of the disorder is not clearly understood.
Barbeau, "Parkinson's disease: clinical features and etiopathology," in Handbook of Clinical Neurology.
Even though PBC destruction is a key issue in the etiopathology of DM1, recent studies have demonstrated that this process is also present in other types of DM; however, cell death mechanisms of PBC differ according to type.
Arenas, "Etiopathology of pinguecula and pterigium," Cornea, vol.
Although the etiopathology of the Sjogren syndrome is still unknown, humoral- and cell-mediated immunity phenomena are involved in the process; as a matter of fact, increased activation of B cells followed by immune complex formation and autoantibody production plays important roles [21].
One of the reasons is certainly the fact that the etiopathology of the disease has not yet been completely explained.