etiology


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etiology

 [e″te-ol´ah-je]
the science dealing with causes of disease. adj., adj etiolog´ic, etiolog´ical.
Etiology classification of disease. Illustrated here are the contributions of intrinsic, extrinsic, and unknown factors to disease causation. From Copstead and Banasik, 2000.

e·ti·ol·o·gy

(ē'tē-ol'ŏ-jē), Avoid the jargonistic substitution of this word for cause (of disease).
1. The science and study of the causes of disease and their mode of operation. Compare: pathogenesis.
2. The science of causes, causality; in common usage, the cause itself.
[G. aitia, cause, + logos, treatise, discourse]

etiology

also

aetiology

(ē′tē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. etiolo·gies
1.
a. The study of causes or origins.
b. The branch of medicine that deals with the causes or origins of disease.
2.
a. Assignment of a cause, an origin, or a reason for something.
b. The cause or origin of a disease or disorder as determined by medical diagnosis.

e′ti·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), e′ti·o·log′i·cal adj.
e′ti·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
e′ti·ol′o·gist n.

Aetiology

(1) As commonly used in medical practice, cause.
(2) A branch of knowledge concerned with the causes of particular phenomena; specifically, a branch of medical science concerned with the causes and origins of diseases. This definition is rarely used in the working parlance.

etiology

1. The study of the cause of a disease, including its origin and what pathogens, if any, are involved.
2. Cause of a disease.
3. The branch of philosophy which deals with factors of causation or the factors associated with the causation of disease or abnormal body states Medtalk → Vox populi Cause.

e·ti·ol·o·gy

(ē'tē-ol'ŏ-jē)
1. The science and study of the causes of disease and their mode of operation.
Compare: pathogenesis
2. The science of causes, causality; in common usage, cause.
Synonym(s): aetiology.
[G. aitia, cause, + logos, treatise, discourse]

etiology

see AETIOLOGY.

aetiology 

The cause or origin of a disease. Note: also spelt etiology. See diagnosis; epidemiology.

e·ti·ol·o·gy

(ē'tē-ol'ŏ-jē)
1. Science and study of causes of disease and their mode of operation.
2. The science of causes, causality; in common, but to some, incorrect, usage, the cause itself.
[G. aitia, cause, + logos, treatise, discourse]

Patient discussion about etiology

Q. how is depression caused by having cancer treated? I mean not only the patient, also the family members who tend to get depressed by the situation. how can you treat thi skind of depression?

A. thanks guys, you are great. Nice to have such a community here.

Q. What causes fibromyalgia? Is fibromyalgia a deadly disease?

A. The causes of fibromyalgia are not known. But there are many theories such as abnormalities in brain chemicals, infections, trauma, genetics and hormonal changes. Factors such as poor sleep, fatigue, overexertion and anxiety, may aggravate the symptoms. Fibromyalgia is not a progressive or life-threatening condition, but it affects quality of life. Fibromyalgia is only a disorder of muscles and not a disease.

Q. Is that true that mouth sores are caused by lack of vitamins? I’ve been having white mouth sores in the past 6 months or so. Could that mean I have to take vitamin supplements?

A. yup ... autoimmune reactions means your immune system is not working well
it's not working well because it lacks the nutrient and vitamins it needs to function properly
- take lots of vitamin c to boost your immune system
- organic multivitamins
- organic juices high in anti oxidants
- and most important .. omega 3-6-9

More discussions about etiology
References in periodicals archive ?
Table-II: Relationship between etiology of status epilepticus and the age of occurrence.
Second, for this analysis, all outbreaks without a laboratory-confirmed etiology (e.g., outbreaks with a suspected or unknown etiology) were classified as having an unidentified etiology.
Despite the guidance she offered for linking specific tantrum features with DMDD, she also reiterated that tantrums cannot be considered a symptom specific to any single etiology. The difference between etiologies for irritable children having a tantrum "is not how they feel, the difference is what they do," Dr.
Descriptive statistics was applied to measure frequency and percentages from categorical variables like etiology, clinical presentation and management outcome and mean and standard deviation from quantitative numerical variables like age of patients and biochemical laboratory parameters like ESR, hemoglobin and TLC levels.
The socioeconomic status of the patient is associated with the ability to accomplish the common etiology investigations and might influence the rate of UE strokes, especially in low- or middle-income countries.
Hypertension was also the major risk factor in small vessel disease (n=60;92,3%) and undetermined etiology (n=13;56,5%) with p=0,023 and p<0,001, respectively.
According to CHCC 2012 classification, it seems that more patients with cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis will be named as vasculitis associated with probable etiology in the future.
In seven cases (9.58%), no etiology could be established, and imaging also did not indicate any possible diagnosis.
The present study provides primary data on the association between the etiology of ESRD and cfPWV among HD patients, where vascular renal disease and diabetic nephropathy were independently associated with higher cfPWV as compared with other etiologies of ESRD.
Male to female ratio was 4:1.Most common etiology for patients reporting to ER department with acute injury were due to RTA (48%) followed by fall from height (23%).Sixty eight percent patients were referred from other district hospitals while 32% patients directly approached ER OPD for consultation.
Twenty-six patients (20 male and 6 female; mean age 58.3 [+ or -] 17.8; age range 24-90 years old) with benign etiology and 15 patients (10 male and 5 female; mean age 62.3 [+ or -] 18.1; age range 21-80 years old) with malignant etiology were included in this study.