ethylene oxide


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Related to ethylene oxide: ethyl acetate, ethylene oxide sterilization

ethylene

 [eth´ĭ-lēn]
a colorless, highly flammable gas with a slightly sweet taste and odor, used as an inhalation anesthetic to induce general anesthesia.
ethylene glycol a solvent with a sweet, acrid taste, used as an antifreeze. Acute poisoning by ingestion can result in central nervous system depression, vomiting, hypotension, coma, convulsions, renal damage, and death. While damage is thought to be due to the formed oxalic acid, ethanol is a good treatment because it competitively inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase. The unaltered ethylene glycol is then excreted in the urine.
ethylene oxide a gaseous, flammable alkylating agent with a broad spectrum of activity, capable of killing both spores and viruses; it must be mixed with CO2 or fluorocarbons because it is explosive above 3 per cent. It is used in hospitals, surgery, dentistry, and the pharmaceutical and other industries for disinfecting and sterilizing instruments and equipment that would be destroyed by heat or would be adversely affected by immersion in water or other media. Its optimal germicidal effect occurs after a 3-hour exposure at 30°C.ƒ

Ethylene oxide is toxic because it alkylates tissue constituents; it is carcinogenic and may produce adverse reproductive effects. Inhalation may cause nausea, vomiting, and neurological disorders, and severe exposure may be fatal. Before items exposed to ethylene oxide can be used they must be aired for 5 days at room temperature or for 8 hours at 120° C to remove any trace of the gas. This is also true for articles of clothing, such as gloves and shoes, that have been exposed, because chemical burns can occur when the contaminated clothing comes in contact with the skin.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

eth·yl·ene ox·ide

a fumigant, used for cold sterilization of surgical instruments.
Synonym(s): oxirane
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ethylene oxide

Occupational medicine A gas used to sterilize medical supplies and other materials
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eth·yl·ene ox·ide

(ethi-lēn oksīd)
Fumigant, used for cold sterilization of surgical instruments.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
plant is the largest producer of ethylene oxide and has been manufacturing the chemical since the late 1960s.
* Company capacity shares for key Ethylene Oxide (EO) producers
* Ethylene Oxide (EO) industry market dynamics in Canada from 2005 to 2019, consisting of market size, demand and production outlook, demand by end-use sector, and average prices
In addition to the new chambers, the facility also has updated its existing ethylene oxide processing equipment, including the boilers and chillers.
Demand for ethylene in the production of HDPE, LLDPE, LDPE, ethylene oxide, ethylene dichloride (EDC), ethylbenzene, and other applications will be analyzed in detail.
This survey - which specifically examined exposure to ethylene oxide and glutaraldehyde - also found increased incidence of birth defects in these nurses' children.
The capital injected will be used for the construction of production facilities of Sanjiang Honam to produce ethylene oxide;
Raw material Ethylene glycol (MEG), a derivative of ethylene oxide, is an important raw material for a broad variety of industrial and consumer applications.
More common is EO sterilization, using ethylene oxide gas, which provides for a flexible, reliable and efficient process.
Usable for implants of 30 days or less, it is biocompatible, resistant to body fluids, and sterilizable with radiation, ethylene oxide, or dry heat.
The planned acquisition by British group Ineos of oil giant BP's ethylene oxide and ethylene glycol businesses at the Dormagen plant in Germany has raised concerns in the European Commission which, after a preliminary investigation, found thatathe proposed takeover could generate significant competition concerns given the strong market position that Ineos would gain on the ethylene oxide market.

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