ethology

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ethology

 [ĕ-thol´o-je]
the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state. adj., adj etholog´ical.

e·thol·o·gy

(ē-thol'ŏ-jē),
The study of animal behavior.
[G. ethos, character, habit, + logos, study]

ethology

(ĭ-thŏl′ə-jē, ē-thŏl′-)
n.
1. The scientific study of animal behavior, especially as it occurs in a natural environment.
2. The study of human ethos and its formation.

eth′o·log′i·cal (ĕth′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
e·thol′o·gist n.

ethology

the study of animal behaviour in the natural habitat of the animals concerned.
References in periodicals archive ?
For purposes of the current study, the definition of rough-and-tumble play used by the ethologists was expanded to include superhero play.
Sociobiology is a set of evolutionary theories developed by ethologists to explain social behaviour.
Many of these behaviors are fodder for ethologists even when they are disguised by culture, language, and our aversion to considering the human traits as analogous to instinctual animal behaviors.
According to ethologists, social relation among students is important because it gives them the opportunity to learn specific social skills and appropriate reactions that can be accepted by norms (Perry & Bussey, 1984).
Griffin's rallying call for a return to mentalism clearly struck a chord with some ethologists, though the move in recent years has been towards a more constrained anthropomorphism that maintains the assumption of mental continuity between species while leaving space for parsimony.
Extensive study of working methods, analysis-enabling tools, modes of thinking, descriptive language, used by biologists, entomologists, ethologists, etc., might spur new comprehensions in the field of sociologists, ethnologists, ..., and vice versa.
These ethologists readily made considerable progress in arts scholarship.
In the work of ethologists, those who study the behavior of animals, Erikson finds evidence for aggression and killing as adaptive instincts, particularly between different species.
Recently, ethologists have applied the study of animal behavior to an increasing number of problems relating to conserving rare, declining, and threatened animal species.
In fact, the Peckhams publications on the behavior and classification of jumping spiders and behavior of solitary wasps were crucial in supporting the theory of sexual selection and pioneered many of the techniques and concepts associated with ethologists of the mid twentieth century!
Each time we clone a sheep, a primate, a rodent, and soon a human being, we further prove what evolutionists and ethologists have known for a long time: there is no greater good -- each being transforms and exploits its environment according to its needs.
He argued the importance of "how come" questions like "how come a legal system" and pointed me to the work of ethologists and behavioral psychologists.