ethology

(redirected from ethologically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ethology

 [ĕ-thol´o-je]
the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state. adj., adj etholog´ical.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·thol·o·gy

(ē-thol'ŏ-jē),
The study of animal behavior.
[G. ethos, character, habit, + logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ethology

(ĭ-thŏl′ə-jē, ē-thŏl′-)
n.
1. The scientific study of animal behavior, especially as it occurs in a natural environment.
2. The study of human ethos and its formation.

eth′o·log′i·cal (ĕth′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
e·thol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ethology

the study of animal behaviour in the natural habitat of the animals concerned.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These findings support the concept of "biological preparedness" concerning the ease with which ethologically related stimuli can be associated (i.e., the odors of a predator and pain).
Second, the majority of the experiments provided have not been conducted in an ethologically valid scenario.
Equally, other tasks they carry out, including livestock depredation and crop raiding, ethologically constrain capture by market and conservationist logics as they constitute undesirable encounters for those cohabiting with lions and elephants on the ground.
We also report, for the first time, evidence for ongoing pain-like behaviour in this low-dose paclitaxel model using two ethologically relevant behavioural tests.
Recently, it has been shown that early tagging of cortical networks is a necessary neurobiological process for remote associative olfactory memory formation using the social transmission of food preference (STFP) paradigm, an ethologically based form of associative olfactory memory [29-31], and that this tagging involves epigenetic mechanisms in the recipient orbitofrontal (OFC) areas [35, 36].
Ethologically, Gordia is classified as a grazing (pascichnia) or locomotion (repichnia) trace (Buatois et al.
Golani, "Rats and mice share common ethologically relevant parameters of exploratory behavior," Behavioural Brain Research, vol.
In contrast to the accumulation of knowledge about the effects of aversive laboratory stressors (e.g., shock, cold-water swim), relatively few studies have examined the consequences of exposing animals to ethologically relevant types of stressors.