ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
In recounting Demant Hatt's fascinating life, Barbara Sjoholm investigates the boundaries and influences between ethnographers and sources, the nature of authorship and visual representation, and the state of anthropology, racial biology, and politics in Scandinavia during the first half of the twentieth century.
In this edited collection, ethnographers discuss their experiences of seeking to serve and/or influence non-academic audiences.
What is paradoxical is that it is not so much the native who seems to need an ethnographer, but vice versa.
As the editors of the volume Jewish Studies at the Crossroads of Anthropology and History argue, the 1970s was the era in which "the text, taken metaphorically to include the social actions that ethnographers observed as well as the archival evidence that historians gathered, emerged as an idiom of common purpose." (7) Anthropologists offered conceptual tools and cross-cultural comparison for historians.
When the ethnographer is already part of the community, the ethnographer is able to negotiate the politics of representation and identification from a perspective of his or her own practice, or within already established relationships.
Understanding how the ABC Pool community manager operates highlights the connection of that role to the ethnographer, and thus highlights the second ethnographic methodological problem within this article: how does the researcher address reflexivity while participating in the research field?
The fact that Russian statisticians, ethnographers, anthropologists, psychiatrists, and government officials participated in international discussions on the human sciences and their practical applications underlines the importance of the comparative context.
Moreover, the consideration of the different stages of post-fieldwork processes provides the budding ethnographer with a strategy to follow after the hectic experience of fieldwork.
It begins by providing a biographical sketch of Covello and then explores his professional and personal philosophy and the way that these played out in his roles as educational and community leader, sociopolitical activist, and community ethnographer. It then examines BFHS as a new paradigm for educational institutions, with an emphasis on its pioneering work in developing student leaders, engaging in community activism, and promoting intercultural education.
For Kenneth Lister, the door to a ROM art storeroom would prove to be a portal to a world that would intrigue, enchant, and some might say obsess the intrepid ethnographer for decades to come.
Now 90, Arnold got privileged access to film the royal wedding preparations and recorded the events with an ethnographer's eye.
"North By Northeast: Wabanaki, Akwesasne Mohawk, and Tuscarora Tarditional Arts" by folklorist and ethnographer Kathleen Mundell showcases the works and commentaries of thirty-five traditional Native American artists living and working primarily in Maine and New York.