ethnobotany


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ethnobotany

Herbal medicine
The field of alternative healthcare that formally studies the relationship between plants and a population, in particular the medicinal use of plants by an ethnic group. The ethonobotanical approach to drug discovery is more efficient than random searches for plant-derived agents of therapeutic interest; drugs so discovered include aspirin (Filipendula ulmaria), codeine (Papaver somniferum), ipecac (Psychotria ipecacuanha), pilocarpine (Pilocarpus jaborandi), reserpin (Rauvolfia serpentina), theophylline (Camelia sinensis) and vinblastine (Cantharanthus roseus).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

eth·no·bot·a·ny

(ethnō-botă-nē )
A study of the role of plants in the life of early humankind.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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Ethnobotany thus is seen as rescue work, piecing together the relics of information from collapsing hunting and gathering systems as they are progressively forced to adapt to European agriculture.
That sense of urgency prompted Cox recently to accept two demanding jobs nearly simultaneously: the King Carl XVI Gustaf Professor of Environmental Science post at the Swedish Biodiversity Centre (where he lectures on ethnobotany and conducts research on Arctic plants) and directorship of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.
The book should appeal to a wide readership with lay or professional interests in any of the following areas: botany, ethnobotany, North American anthropology, medicinal chemistry, herbal or folk medicine, pharmacognosy, history or geography of the Prairie Bioregion.
Eleven of the families are still staying at the Gua Musang Ethnobotany National Service Training camp, while the remaining are staying with relatives after their houses were destroyed in the 2014 floods, he told reporters after when met at the housing area here today.
Contributors include experts in garden and landscape studies, history of botanical and medical gardens, architectural history, and landscape architecture, in addition to scholars in medicinal plants, ethnobotany, and ethnopharmacology, and even poetry and religious studies.
Vincent Le-Bot's 1992 book Kava: The Pacific Drug (retitled in 1997 as Kava: The Pacific Elixir: The Definitive Guide to Its Ethnobotany, History and Chemistry) clearly demonstrated the impact of kava on local communities, noting its daily use--included all social rituals.
Complete with pen line illustrations and a center section of full color photographs, the 100 plants are some of the most common Reservation flora compiled from the more than 1,500 species of wild, vascular plants that include ferns, horsetails, conifers and flowering species and which were selected by the Navajo Health Authority, Ethnobotany Project staff and approved by the Navajo Medicine Men's Association.
More than 20 fields of research will be represented at the center, including molecular and cell biology, physical chemistry, ethnobotany, sensory analysis, formulation, toxicology and histology, among many others.
In this temporary learning community, participants follow their own interests individually and as a group, focusing on archeology, history, ethnobotany, sacred plants and medicines, agriculture, arts and music, sustainability, Andean mysticism and more.
Researchers in medicine, psychology, ethnobotany, law, religion and anthropology gathered in Heidelberg, Germany in May 2008 for a conference on the psychoactive plant ayahuasca, which is native to Amazonia, and its use and users.
The plants selected to be included came from a wealth of over 1,500 species by the Navajo Health Authority, Ethnobotany Project staff, and was approved by the Navajo Medicine Men's Association.