ethmoturbinals

eth·mo·tur·bi·nals

(eth'mō-tŭr'bi-nălz),
Collective term for the conchae of the ethmoid bone; the superior and middle nasal conchae; occasionally a third, the supreme concha, exists. See: middle nasal concha, superior nasal concha, supreme nasal concha.

eth·mo·tur·bi·nals

(eth'mō-tŭr'bi-nălz)
The conchae of the ethmoid bone; the superior and middle conchae; occasionally a third, the supreme concha, exists.

eth·mo·tur·bi·nals

(eth'mō-tŭr'bi-nălz)
Collective term for conchae of ethmoid bone; superior and middle nasal conchae; occasionally a third, supreme concha, exists.
See: middle nasal concha, supreme nasal concha
References in periodicals archive ?
The basal lamella of the middle turbinate is actually the third basal lamella of the ethmoturbinals. The insertion of the middle turbinate lies in three different planes.
However, the turbinates most frequently cited with reference to endothermy in therapsids have been ethmoturbinals (e.g., Watson 1913; Brink 1956; Van Valen 1960; Bennett and Ruben 1986).
Posteriorly, numerous ethmoturbinals typically fill the olfactory portion of the nasal cavity.
It is often considered one of the ethmoturbinals (e.g., Allen 1882; Paulli 1900a,b,c; Allison 1953; Moore 1981), as at least part of it appears to have the same embryonic origin as the latter.
The ethmoturbinals, alternately, are incapable of modifying the water content of large volumes of air.
This implies that mammalian ethmoturbinals evolved later, after the divergence of reptiles and mammals.
Whereas the ethmoturbinals are far more complex and extensive than reptilian conchae, they retain the same sensory function.
As mentioned above, the nasoturbinal is often considered one of the ethmoturbinals; it may have extended forward to allow air samples to bypass the maxilloturbinal.
Conversely, the mammalian ethmoturbinals retain the primitive olfactory function of the nasal conchae, although their increased complexity in mammals might be correlated to high air current velocities.
The ethmoturbinals are supported by a series of more or less parallel ridges, usually located on the ventromedial surfaces of the frontal bone.
The arrangement of these ridges closely resembles the typical pattern in modern mammals and indicates that both respiratory and olfactory turbinates (i.e., maxilloturbinals, and naso- and ethmoturbinals) were present.
Remnants of maxilloturbinals and ethmoturbinals, which indicate that these structures were quite extensive and complex, are described in several specimens.