ethics


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ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bopp, Ethics and Consumer Protection Division Director Lori Holcomb, and our hardworking staff: Ethics Counsel Elizabeth Clark Tarbert, Assistant Ethics Counsels Joy A.
One must acknowledge that, despite the education and the institutions' code of ethics, it is not a simple task to be an ethical teacher.
In Pakistan, the last decade has seen a great expansion in higher education institutions resulting in induction of a great number of teachers, the training programs of Higher Education Commission (HEC) have very little relevance to teacher's professional development especially in the area of professional ethics. Other than establishment of Quality Enhancement Cells (QECs) in HEC in order to assess some aspects of professional ethics (such as the problem of plagiarism), its focus is limited to enforcing penalties for misconduct/ malpractice, while the proper training and appraisal regarding comprehensive professional ethics for teachers in different roles is generally ignored.
Chapters in the fourth section (as well as the final assessment by the editors) reflect on how to subvert, resist and avoid the problems with ethics review as it is practiced today.
Valuable researches suggested innovations in teaching ethics and highlighted legal aspects.
In 2014, ANA participated as a strategic partner in the National Nursing Ethics Summit convened by the Johns Hopkins University's Berman Institute of Bioethics and School of Nursing to strengthen ethics in the profession.
All DoD employees appointed as ethics counselors must be attorneys.
Role of Ethics in the evolution of Medicine has been given due importance covering subjects like Research Ethics, Human experimentation, the scourge of drug trials, Human embryonic stem cell research, Stem cell in cultivation of sensory organs, Cybird: is science going mad?
Professional ethics, according to the Webster's Third New International Dictionary Unabridged, is defined as "the principles of conduct governing an individual or a profession: standards of behavior." This definition provides insights that course content should include both principles and rules.
invests in ethics education for all employees with the primary goal of promoting an ethically aware culture where our people are encouraged to raise questions and voice concerns without fear of retaliation.
The Role of Corporate Governance in Improving Business Ethics
My hope is to put forward a range of options from which to think about the study of ethics. Based on these observations, I conclude with several base points for the study of Christian ethics within the shifting landscape of church and society.