ethicist


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ethicist

 [eth´ĭ-sist]
in health care, a person with graduate education, preferably doctoral, who is expert in bioethics and has broad knowledge in philosophy and medicine or nursing, and whose job it is to help sort through difficult clinical situations to find ethical solutions.
References in periodicals archive ?
"It has been a privilege to be a part of that conversation," she wrote in her penultimate Ethicist post.
The situation is compounded when the ethicist is in a position of power inferior to the science PI.
Additionally, the company said that Kaminer will continue to write The Times's City Critic column that explores the urban experience for the Metropolitan section and she replaces the current ethicist, Randy Cohen who is leaving the magazine to pursue a new radio show.
Beginning with recollections of his own father's death and the role of ethicists in an increasingly complicated medical world, in That Good Night: Ethicists, Euthanasia and End-of-Life Care journalist Tim Falconer explores how modern high-tech medicine has ironically made dying worse, rather than better.
Clearly, the last refuge for a scooped Post editor is an ethicist.
It is of interest to note that some principle-based ethicists regard natural moral law, not as reason's understanding of divine law, but as analogous to the physical laws of science.
The growing gulf between patients requiring organ transplants and the number of persons willing to give them is spurring some ethicists to call for new--and sometimes radical--ways to encourage donations.
Still, I am not of the view that there is an essence of ethics and an essence of experts such that it could be demonstrated that there is an inherent contradiction in the very idea of a professional ethicist. Although I am no expert in the philosophy of language, I am of the Wittgensteinian persuasion that the meaning of terms is fixed by their usage, lf, for whatever reason, the community is eager to believe that there in a priest class of ethicists, then so be it.
But threatening as just the sound of that word can be, it is even more unsettling for me if the speaker of this word announces himself to be an ethicist. (The voice usually drops here with the weight of gravitas.
In spite of the differences between consultations performed by ethics committees and those carried out by individual clinical ethicists, these discussions of ethics committees can be very useful when considering the individual ethicist.
And, as Peter Berkowitz has written, someone who presents himself to the world as an ethicist is supposed to have thought through the practical consequences of his ethics.
As a Christian theologian and ethicist I don't dare propose that we can make total sense of the evil that occurred.