ether

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ether

 [e´ther]
1. an organic compound containing an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms.
2. diethyl or ethyl ether: a colorless, transparent, mobile, very volatile, highly flammable liquid with a characteristic odor; it was the first inhalational anesthetic used for surgical anesthesia, but is now rarely used in the United States or Canada because of its flammability.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr),
1. Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, thus containing the group -C-O-C-.
See also: epoxy.
2. Loosely used to refer to diethyl ether or an anesthetic ether, although a large number of ethers have anesthetic properties. For individual ethers, see the specific name.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ether

(ē′thər)
n.
1. Any of a class of organic compounds in which two hydrocarbon groups are linked by an oxygen atom.
2. A volatile, highly flammable liquid, C4H10O, derived from distilling ethyl alcohol with sulfuric acid, used as a reagent and solvent, and formerly used as an anesthetic. Also called diethyl ether, ethyl ether.
3. The regions of space beyond the earth's atmosphere; the heavens.
4. The element believed in ancient and medieval civilizations to fill all space above the sphere of the moon and to compose the stars and planets.
5. Physics An all-pervading, infinitely elastic, massless medium formerly postulated as the medium of propagation of electromagnetic waves.

e·ther′ic (ĭ-thĕr′ĭk, ĭ-thîr′-) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr)
1. Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, thus containing the group -C-O-C-.
See also: epoxy
2. Loosely used to refer to diethyl ether.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ether

A volatile and highly inflammable liquid once widely used as a safe and effective drug for the induction and continuance of general anaesthesia. Induction is slow and unpleasant and deep anaesthesia is needed for muscle relaxation. Postoperative nausea is common. Because of these disadvantages and the danger of explosion, ether is now seldom used. The drug is, however, on the WHO official list.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

e·ther

(ē'thĕr)
Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, but commonly used to refer to diethyl ether or an anesthetic ether, although a large number of ethers have anesthetic properties.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This can only happen if your etheric is weak; or they inhabit houses, dark dirty places or isolated buildings - feeding on the etheric of the house until it can find a host body to parasite on.
The etheric solution was washed twice with a saturated solution of sodium thiosulfate and with brine before being dried over anhydrous MgS[O.sub.4].
Remarkably prolific, Benjie tends to opt for group shows although he currently celebrated his exhibit at the Avellana Gallery entitled, "Silver Chords," whose title is a representation of the mystical silver chord that links the higher self to our physical body and the synthesis of the physical, etheric, astral and mental body.
Today's self-evident 'scientific truth' becomes tomorrow's quaint oddity to join etheric transmission and the miasma theory of disease propagation in the dustbin of scientific history.
This cultural sphere interconnects with an 'organic' and an 'etheric' or 'spiritual' sphere.
Both shamanic and Gnostic experientially-derived doctrines also posit the existence of an etheric double, a practitioner's "second personality" (Musi 3), linked to the macrocosm in the same way that the shaman's earthly body was linked to the microcosm.
THE 'universal life energy' is believed to flow both within the physical body and surrounding it, in what is known as the 'aura' (also called the 'etheric body', 'auric body' and 'energy body').
Leadbeater, a clairvoyant, claimed to be able to see the chakras on the etheric plane where a "double" of each person exists: "When awakened and vivified they are seen as blazing coruscating whirlpools much increased in size and resembling miniature suns."
The copolymer thus formed consists of substituted C9 units (6 aromatic and 3 propene carbons) interconnected by C-O (mostly etheric) or C-C bonds [5].
"Johnny Graphic and the Etheric Bomb" is a novel drawing from classic pulpy style of the 1930s, following Johnny Graphic, aspiring photographer, as he discovers ghosts covering every level of his desired career path.