ethereal

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ethereal

 [e-the´re-al]
1. pertaining to, prepared with, containing, or resembling ether.
2. evanescent; delicate.

e·the·re·al

(ē-thēr'ē-ăl),
1. Relating to or containing ether.
2. Dissolved in an ether.
[G. aitherios, etherial, fr. aithēr, the upper air]

e·the·re·al

(ĕ-thēr'ē-ăl)
Relating to or containing ether.
[G. aitherios, etherial, fr. aithēr, the upper air]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the brief comment 'The etherial humbug' he informs his readers that Pugh's letter of 18 June expressing concern about the safety of etherisation was placed on the front page at the cost of a loss of advertising space (Figure 1).
As it may be of interest to your readers to receive local testimony, in addition to the published reports of cases, in which surgical operations have been divested of the usual suffering attendant on such proceedings by the use of Etherial inhalation, I beg to furnish you with the results of a trial of this novel discovery, made at St.
"Richard Phillips," writes Carnall, "believed he had confuted Newton's theory of gravitation, and repeated the confutation, whether in the Monthly Magazine over the signature of 'Common Sense,' or in the school textbooks of which he was a prolific publisher." (30) Blake evidently thought Phillips would see the connection between anti-Newtonianism and scoffing at the stars' "influence"--a word that Blake uses in his writings eight times (31) in the sense of "the supposed flowing or streaming from the stars or heavens of an etherial fluid acting upon the character and destiny of men" (OED).
Annibale's tiny Coronation of St Stephen (Weiner Collection, New York) is a cerulean hymn of praise, as etherial as the miniatures by Elsheimer nearby.
In the face of such blankly physical forces as sexuality, money, and death, "Elizabethan" mercantilism suggests the "truth of life" for which so much of her writing yearns; it teases, coyly promising but finally denying an escape from the modernist predicament of "meaninglessness."(3) Ultimately, mercantile culture fails as a metaphor for Woolf because it already carries with it the early symptoms of the modern disease: its exotic-sounding consumer products - such as silk and oil - did not imply any transcendent value; its heroes (pirates) were not really searching for God; its poets, as much as they spoke of an etherial absolute, wrote for a crowded, democratized, unwashed populace; its heavenly paeans to its Virgin Queen only immortalized a woman (and not necessarily a virgin woman).
The wedding party and guests entered through an aisle which had an etherial feel--lined with antique gold lanterns and greenery, facing an open stone fireplace, decorated with eucalyptus garland, flowers, and candles.
Roger McGuinn's transcendental 12 string guitar and etherial vocals were among the most distinctive trademarks of mid 1960s popular music.
As Reiman and Fraistat astutely remark, the opening section "displays PBS's diction, tone and perspective that continually enlist the denotations and connotations of words and the mellifluous quality of their sounds to transform solid physical objects into transient, etherial states of moral significance" (210).
The problem is that the ideas being foisted on Birmingham City Council are thought up by policy wonks whose ideas come from focus groups and discussions within the relatively etherial Westminster bubble.
WIMI offers augmented reality (AR)-based holographic products and services centered on providing an innovative, immersive and interactive holographic augmented reality experience, for 'Customers' who have contracted with the Company to use its products and services subject to the contracts during the relevant period, and 'End users', who enthral in etherial AR experiences.
Etherial Guest at e'en an Outcast's Pillow - Essential Host, in Life's faint, wailing Inn, Later than Light thy Consciousness accost Me Till it depart, persuading Mine - (Fr989/1865) Linking the air with Dickinson's breath awareness, Curran rightly notes the air's "versatility, mutability, and potency" (88).
Kharon has an etherial form that allows him to pass through concrete objects.