etc.

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etc.

And so forth.
[L. et cetera]
References in classic literature ?
{144} From this and other passages in the "Odyssey" it appears that we are in an age anterior to the use of coined money--an age when cauldrons, tripods, swords, cattle, chattels of all kinds, measures of corn, wine, or oil, etc. etc., not to say pieces of gold, silver, bronze, or even iron, wrought more or less, but unstamped, were the nearest approach to a currency that had as yet been reached.
"He did not miss a single hole from the first onwards." [Greek] according to Liddell and Scott being "the hole for the handle of an axe, etc.," while [Greek] ("Od." v.
{171} The interpretation of lines 126-143 is most dubious, and at best we are in a region of melodrama: cf., however, i.425, etc. from which it appears that there was a tower in the outer court, and that Telemachus used to sleep in it.
Smith (Everyman's Library), 1911; by R.W.Browne (Bohn's Classical Library), 1848, etc.; by R.
Problemata (with writings of other philosophers), 1597, 1607, 1680, 1684, etc. Rhetorica: A summary by T.
You invest in real estate because you expect a payoff--an ongoing profit share, a return on your initial investment when the property is sold, etc. It is essential to determine from the get go a return schedule for you and your partners.
* How to effectively approach residents with dementia and use calming communication techniques (such as validation therapy, distraction, redirection, etc.);
The buyer may expect the works: configuration, host setup, etc. The difference in price can be extreme.
* Descriptive--describing the content, indexing the material, etc.
The ETC Group, which issued its call for a moratorium in a January 2003 report, wants to stop nanotech until "civil society" has a chance to catch up.
Now a common sight on Japan's highway tollgates, the ETC system was introduced by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport in March 2001.
Innate: when referring to immunity, the local barriers to infection such as skin, stomach acid, mucous, enzymes in tears and saliva, etc.