estrone


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Related to estrone: estriol

estrone

 [es´trōn]
an estrogen isolated from pregnancy urine, the human placenta, and palm kernel oil, and also prepared synthetically; used in estrogen replacement therapy for hypogonadism, ovariectomy, primary ovarian failure, atrophic vaginitis, vasomotor menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, and vulvar atrophy, and in the treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding and advanced prostate cancer. Administered intramuscularly or intravaginally. See also conjugated estrogens and esterified estrogens.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

es·trone (E1),

(es'trōn),
A metabolite of 17β-estradiol, commonly found in urine, ovaries, and placenta; has considerably less biologic activity than the parent hormone.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

estrone

(ĕs′trōn′)
n.
An estrogenic hormone, C18H22O2, that is secreted by the ovaries and by fatty tissue. It is the main form of estrogen in postmenopausal women.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

estrone

E1 An estrogen with very low biologic activity that is the major source of estrogen in children and postmenopausal ♀ ↑ in pregnancy, postmenopausal, ↑ age, obesity, luteal phase of menstrual cycle ↓ in hypogonadism. See Androstendione.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

es·trone

(es'trōn)
A metabolite of 17β-estradiol, commonly found in urine, ovaries, and placenta, with considerably less biologic activity than the parent hormone.
Synonym(s): oestrone.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The three major naturally occurring forms of oestrogens which are found in human urine are 17[beta]-estradiol (E2) and its principal metabolites, estrone (E1) and estriol (E3).
Later calli were transferred to MS medium containing 17[beta]-estradiol, estrone, progesterone and androsterone with four different doses (0, 10-4 m mol L-1 and 10-8 m mol L-1 and 10-12 m mol L-1) for 50 days and subcultured in 30 days.
He had also raised follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), androstenedione, and estrone with low-normal testosterone, low androstendiol glucurunide, and normal DHEA levels [Table 2].
[E.sub.1] estrone; [E.sub.2]: estradiol; [E.sub.3]: estriol; 2-[OHE.sub.1]: 2-hydroxyestrone; 2-[OHE.sub.2]: 2-hydroxyestradiol; 16a-[OHE.sub.1] 16a-hydroxyestrone; chlormycetin.
The wavelength used to detect the estrogens: estrone (E1), 17[beta] estradiol (E2), 17[alpha] ethinylestradiol (EE2) was 280 nm, while the progesterone (Pg) was detected at 241 nm.
In this study, compound 3 was synthesized by the reaction of 4-nitrobenzoyl azide with estrone in presence of dimethyl sulfoxide at mild conditions.
It has been shown that most estrogen in postmenopausal women is produced in peripheral adipose tissue by aromatization of androstenedione to estrone [7, 35], especially in obese and overweight women.
Comparing biological effects and potencies of estrone and 17 (3-estradiol in mature fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas.
Summary: A simple salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) method with acetonitrile combined with high-performance liquid-chromatography was developed and applied for the determination four kinds of estrogens (estradiol (bE2), diethylstilbestrol (DES), estrone (E1) and progesterone (PES)) in milk.
The term "estrogen" includes a group of chemically similar hormones: estrone, estradiol (the most abundant in women of reproductive age) and estriol.
Keywords: Oestrogen, Estrone (E1), Estrone sulfate (E1S), Estradiol (E2), Oestrogen receptor (ER), Aromatase (AROM), Aromatase inhibitors (AIs), Steroid sulfatase (STS), 667 COUMATE (STX64), Dual-aromatase-sulfatase inhibitors (DASI).
Levels of E1S in blood are 5-10-fold higher than that of unconjugated estrogens, estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3).