estimate


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estimate

 [es´tĭ-ma]
1. a rough calculation or one based on incomplete data.
2. a statistic used to characterize the value of a population parameter. Called also estimator.
3. (es´tĭ-māt) to produce or use such a calculation or statistic.

es·ti·mate

(es'tĭ-māt),
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data. It is not a random variable but a realization of one, a fixed quantity, and it has no variance although commonly it also furnishes an estimate of what the variance of the estimator is. (Not to be confused with an estimator, which is a prescription for obtaining an estimate.)
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

estimate

/es·ti·mate/
1. (es´tĭ-mat) a rough calculation or one based on incomplete data.
2. (es´tĭ-mat) a statistic used to characterize the value of a population parameter.
3. (es´tĭ-māt) to produce or use such a calculation or statistic.

estimate

A popular term for an educated guess about a thing or process. See Cookie cutter estimate, Demand-based estimate, Objective probability estimate, Subjective probability estimate.

es·ti·mate

(es'ti-măt)
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data. It is not a random variable but a realization of one, a fixed quantity, and it has no variance although commonly it also furnishes an estimate of what the variance of the estimator is. usage note Not to be confused with an estimator, which is a prescription for obtaining an estimate.
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

es·ti·mate

(es'ti-măt)
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data.
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

estimate,

n the anticipated fee for dental services to be performed.

estimate

a measurement which is believed likely to incorporate a degree of error.

Patient discussion about estimate

Q. Hi friends, I like to estimate my body fat based on my height and weight. Hi friends, I like to estimate my body fat based on my height and weight. When I enquired about this I heard about BMI. Though I understood little about it I want to know more about what is BMI and why is it useful?

A. the BMI is not a very good method...it only helps if you are an average person. you can gain weight if you start training and still get in shape and loose fat. but it is our only cheap method...there are gyms that hold a way of measuring body fat- maybe try going to one of those?

More discussions about estimate
References in periodicals archive ?
The auditors also should communicate to the audit committee significant accounting estimates, methods and assumptions.
As a demolition estimator, the hardest hurdles to overcome, after making an estimating mistake, may be restoring your self-confidence and re-establishing the confidence level the owner has in your future estimates.
The recognition that for some low level of sampling variability, all sides can live with the point estimate is a good beginning.
The fitted values consisted of the log-relative risk of mortality, along with a variance estimate, for each of the 144 cities.
For that reason auditors should assess the risk that the estimate could be misstated by considering factors such as
In the May estimate, there's a lot of things that weren't in the February estimate,'' said Steve Hodgson, superintendent of services for the Glendale Unified School District.
Often, so much emphasis is placed on completing the Title V application that foundries fail to realize the importance of strategic considerations related to the reported emissions estimates.
But recent studies have produced markedly different estimates of the pace of clearing, raising questions about the accuracy of deforestation figures that have floated around policy circles in recent years.
Thus, the Forest Service estimates that nearly 3 million acres (68 percent) of the remaining old-growth would be protected with the HCAs, though 1.
Also, there is a significant degree of uncertainty in the assumptions needed to estimate these obligations, particularly the health care cost trend rate.
The method described by Wallinga and Teunis (2) is then used to estimate the number of early secondary cases from the daily counts of symptom onsets.
To develop a competitive demolition estimate, remember the following formula: Cost Estimate = (V x ROP x COP) + DC - SC.