esophagography

esophagography

 [ĕ-sof″ah-gog´rah-fe]
radiography of the esophagus.

e·soph·a·gog·ra·phy

(ĕ-sof-ă-gog'ră-fē),
Radiography of the esophagus using swallowed or injected radiopaque contrast media; the technique of obtaining an esophagram.
[esophagus + G. graphō, to write]

e·soph·a·gog·ra·phy

(ĕ-sof'ă-gog'ră-fē)
Radiography of the esophagus using swallowed or injected radiopaque contrast media;the technique of obtaining an esophagogram.
Synonym(s): oesophagography.
[esophagus + G. graphō, to write]
References in periodicals archive ?
Follow-up endoscopy and esophagography were performed immediately after procedures and then 2, 3, and 4 weeks later.
Caption: Figure 3: Endoscopic image and esophagography showing complete closure of the leakage after completion of the E-VAC therapy.
The next day a double-contrast esophagography was ordered to delineate the morphologic features of the esophagus and for the assessment of the total extent of esophageal stenosis.
Esophagography revealed barium retention at the laryngeal part of the pharynx (Figure 1) and anterior displacement of the esophagus and trachea at C4-5 due to OALL, although swallow motility otherwise appeared normal.
Metastatic esophageal tumors are usually located in the submucosal layer [7]; therefore, esophagography and endoscopy show severe luminal stricture with normal overlying mucosa, which often complicates histological diagnoses.
Barium-contrast esophagography can more accurately depict the oblique defect or indentation along the posterior esophageal wall.
Esophagography demonstrated contrast leakage in the ipsilateral cervical openings via tracts from the bilateral tonsillar fossae (figure, B).
Additionally, the sensitivity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of EUS tend to be better than those of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and esophagography [4].
Metastases to the esophagus usually occur via lymphangitic spread and present as submucosal lesions with normal mucosa, thus resulting in normal EGD and esophagography [10, 11].
The esophagus has traditionally been examined in great detail by contrast fluoroscopy or endoscopy, and subtle pathology may potentially be missed when depending on CT for screening evaluation without the mucosal detail provided by contrast esophagography. The presentation of chest pain without direct trauma should always include esophageal disease as a differential diagnosis.
The survey radiographs confirmed that there was soft tissue density in the midcervical region but not conclusive for perforation or fistula but esophagography helped to confirm esophageal fistula as reported earlier by Kasari (1984).