esophageal varices


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varix

 [vār´iks] (L.)
an enlarged, tortuous vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
aneurysmal varix a markedly dilated tortuous vessel; sometimes used to denote a form of arteriovenous aneurysm in which the blood flows directly into a neighboring vein without the intervention of a connecting sac.
arterial varix a racemose aneurysm or varicose artery.
esophageal varices varicosities of branches of the azygous vein which anastomose with tributaries of the portal vein in the lower esophagus; due to portal hypertension in cirrhosis of the liver.
lymph varix (varix lympha´ticus) a soft, lobulated swelling of a lymph node due to obstruction of lymphatic vessels.

e·soph·a·ge·al var·i·ces

longitudinal venous varices at the lower end of the esophagus as a result of portal hypertension; they are superficial and liable to ulceration and massive bleeding.

esophageal varices

The presence of varices under the esophageal mucosa, which most commonly occurs in a background of advanced liver disease Etiology Portal HTN, schistosomiasis Management Acute hemorrhage of EVs is treated by balloon compression; rebleeding is common, and is preemptively managed with endoscopic sclerotherapy, which in turn is often complicated by rebleeding, stenosis, & esophageal ulceration; some data suggest that combined modality therapy with a β-blocking agent–nadolol, propranolol and an anti-hypertensive–isosorbide mononitrate is better than endoscopic sclerotherapy in treating EVs Prognosis Good if unrelated to cirrhosis. See Endoscopic sclerotherapy, Nadolol with isosorbide mononitrate.

e·soph·a·ge·al va·ri·ces

(ĕ-sof'ă-jē'ăl var'i-sēz)
Longitudinal venous varices at the lower end of the esophagus as a result of portal hypertension; they are superficial and liable to ulceration and massive bleeding.
Synonym(s): oesophageal varices.

e·soph·a·ge·al va·ri·ces

(ĕ-sof'ă-jē'ăl var'i-sēz)
Longitudinal venous varices at lower end of esophagus as a result of portal hypertension; superficial and liable to ulceration and massive bleeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Endoscopic therapy for bleeding esophageal varices improves the outcome of Child C cirrhotic patients.
Despite the fact that TIPS is more effective than endoscopic therapy in decreasing rebleeding from esophageal varices (19 percent rebleeding with TIPS vs.
Several retrospective studies have shownthat SAAG and serum albumin as probable noninvasive biochemical markers of esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients and SAAG has been concluded an indirect biochemical marker in detecting the occurrence and grades of esophageal varices as a n endoscopic parameter of portal hypertension.
A non-parametric statistical analysis was applied to the data, such as esophageal varices and platelet count, which were the clinical and laboratory findings of portal hypertension, the histopathological findings, and the demographic data.
Patients with concurrent esophageal varices were treated with either endoscopic band ligation (EBL) or endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS).
The budget impact of endoscopic screening for esophageal varices in cirrhosis.
Caption: Figure 2: A 53-year-old man had esophageal varices with red color sign and a history of variceal therapy.
Gastroscope or upper gastrointestinal radiography found gastric varices in all 18 cases, and esophageal varices in 4 cases.{Figure 1}
Endoscopic variceal ligation in prophylaxis of first variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients with high-risk esophageal varices. Hepatology 1997; 25: 1346-50.
Background: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to esophageal varices is a common emergency in gastroenterology unit.
In all, nearly one-fourth (22.6%) discontinued therapy, and there were five deaths: from septicemia, septic shock, pneumopathy, endocarditis, and bleeding esophageal varices. Other complications in this group were grade 3 or 4 infections in 6.5%, grade 3 or 4 hepatic decompensation in 2%, grade 3/4 asthenia in 5.5%, and renal failure in 1.7%.
The evolving role of endoscopic treatment for bleeding esophageal varices. World J Surg 2005;29:966-973.