esophageal ulcer


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Related to esophageal ulcer: esophageal hernia

esophageal ulcer

GI disease A hole in the esophageal mucosa, which may be due to acid reflux from the stomach, H pylori infection, NSAIDs, cigarette smoking Clinical Pain may not correlate with severity of ulceration Diagnosis Barium swallow, endoscopy Complications Bleeding, perforation Treatment Antibiotics to eradicate H pylori, eliminating risk factors. See Caustic injury to esophagus, GERD.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hernandez-Albujar et al., "Idiopathic esophageal ulcer with fistulization to the bronchial tree in a HIV-positive patient," Revista Espanola de Enfermedades Digestivas, vol.
Based on previous studies, we predicted that BHSST, containing these bioactive herbs as constituents, would enhance ameliorating effects on esophageal ulcer induced chronic acid reflux esophagitis.
Diagnosis of esophageal ulcers in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
The use of drugs to treat such conditions as esophageal reflux "heartburn" , hiatus hernia, esophagitis and esophageal ulcer, and swallowing difficulties--as well as the enormous popularity of antiulcer medications--has led to the hypothesis that these drugs may be a causative factor.
Molecular mechanisms of epithelial regeneration and neovascularization during healing of gastric and esophageal ulcers. Current Medicinal Chemistry, 19: 1627.
Patients with HIV may develop one or more giant esophageal ulcers that are caused directly by the HIV virus itself, as confirmed on electron microscopy of biopsy specimens showing viral particles with morphologic features of HIV.
* Esophageal ulcers: These are crater-like sores in the lining of the esophagus, which can bleed and may sometimes cause anemia (low red blood cell counts).
(1) The agent's manufacturer also warns that alendronate can cause upper gastrointestinal irritation that can lead to esophagitis, esophageal ulcers, and esophageal erosions with bleeding; in rare cases, esophageal stricture or perforation may occur.
Idiopathic esophageal ulcers, also known as chronic HIV-associated esophageal ulcerations, is a diagnosis of exclusion and usually occur in patients with CD4 cell counts less than 100/[micro]L.
These include nausea and heartburn, esophageal ulcers, diarrhea, constipation, dizziness, headaches, and more frequent (and possibly painful) urination.
After three months, three percent of patients on famotidine and 15 percent of those on placebo had stomach ulcers; half of one percent of patients on famotidine and 17 percent of those on placebo had gastrointestinal ulcers; and four percent of patients on famotidine and 19 percent on placebo had esophageal ulcers.