escape response


Also found in: Wikipedia.

escape response

any flight reaction elicited in an animal as a result of a threat.
References in periodicals archive ?
That's what is so paradoxical about this escape response - it seems to cancel out the exercise response and maintains extreme bradycardia even when the whales are exercising hard," Williams said in (https://news.
The intensity of the escape response was best predicted by the aspect ratio and the obliqueness of the adductor muscle.
For example, the experience-dependent behavior of prey capture and the escape response observed throughout development of squid is highly dependent on the inhibitory control of the giant synapse output (Preuss and Gilly, 2000).
But as they planned to escape response officers arrived on the scene - four minutes after a passer-by had spotted the robbery and called 999.
Ten minutes after intranasal midazolam or saline solution administration, the birds were recaptured (second capture) and evaluated and scored for vocalization, defense, escape response, and ease of capture.
If at any time during the study the participant emitted a known escape response, such as hand waving, attempting to leave the table, grunts, or sounds of agitation, he was allowed to escape, and the sessions were discontinued briefly.
detect the change in air pressure caused by a fast approaching object, and can trigger an escape response in less than 50 ms (Camhi & Tom 1978).
However, the high rate of attacks and the eiders' dramatic escape response suggest that walruses can at times be effective predators on them, and may affect the eiders' dispersion and energy balance.
Experience-dependent modification of ultrasound auditory processing in a cricket escape response.
Cockroaches have long been studied as a model for understanding animal escape response, and further research could help scientists better understand how animals maintain some unpredictability when escaping predators.
Here we describe a two-part laboratory experiment (developed as part of Vassar College's Neuroscience and Behavior program curriculum) designed to examine two putative defensive adaptations in an aquatic predator-prey system: multimodal predator detection systems and the fast-start escape response.
To make sure the flies' escape response wasn't activated just by seeing the light flashes, Miesenbock and Lima tested the same experiments on flies genetically engineered to be blind and even on decapitated flies.