escalate

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escalate

(ĕs′kă-lāt) [L. scala, staircase]
1. To increase, esp. the dosage of a medication.
2. To become more angry, dangerous, or intense, as in an interpersonal crisis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drafting an effective escalation clause that is acceptable to a homeowner takes some skill.
* A stop is the escalation method in which a fixed dollar amount for operating expenses is established as a landlord's obligation, with all expenses incurred above that point being the tenant's responsibility.
A gross up of this charge will effectively eliminate this credit for escalation purposes to establish a true full-building cost for janitorial services.
After all operating expenses have been adjusted appropriately, the resulting total expenses will likewise represent a more accurate full-building cost, which can then be applied on a per-square-foot basis or on an aggregate-cost basis for escalation purposes.
This evolution of the CPI escalation clause resulted in the following 2 examples which were widely used: (Illustration of standard CPI clause with two choices of limiting clauses.)
In no event shall an annual escalation exceed 50% of the CPI increase as aforementioned computed ...
The landlord in this case argued that the tax obligation on the building is increased even though the obligation to pay the taxes was merely shifted from the landlord, 1100 Associates, to another tenant, HBO; and that the shifting of the obligation to pay the tax does not nullify the effect of the tax escalation clause under the lease with Bryant Imports.
He stated that he would award the landlord the additional rent under the lease tax escalation clause.
Attorney Peter L Malkin, chairman of Wien, Malkin & Bettex, said all leases in New York include real estate tax escalation pass-throughs and some contain other escalations.
Brock, director of retail leases for Williams Real Estate, Inc., said escalations can be a problem for tenants, particularly if a building was sold and the assessment was raised.
Further it might agree that if this fails and degrading tirades of anger persist, there will be an escalation of intervention that requires this person to move out and live with their uncle.
The idea of responsive regulation is that it is better to be at the base of the pyramid where democratic conversation does the regulatory work, but that if escalation is necessary the decision to escalate should always be open to revision, so de-escalation occurs.