erythroplasia

erythroplasia

 [ĕ-rith″ro-pla´zhah]
a condition of the mucous membranes characterized by red papular lesions.
erythroplasia of Queyrat a form of epithelial dysplasia, which may range in severity from mild disorientation of epithelial cells with variable cellular pleomorphism to changes of carcinoma in situ and even invasive carcinoma, usually found on the glans penis and prepuce of uncircumcised middle-aged and older men; occasionally it may involve the lips, oral mucosa, tongue, vulva, or glabrous skin. It is typically characterized by the development of a slowly growing, circumscribed, erythematous, usually moist, velvety, and shiny patch.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ryth·ro·pla·si·a

(ĕ-rith'rō-plā'zē-ă),
Erythema and dysplasia of the epithelium.
[erythro- + G. plassō, to form]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

e·ryth·ro·pla·si·a

(ĕ-rith'rō-plā'zē-ă)
Erythema and dysplasia of the epithelium.
[erythro- + G. plassō, to form]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Along with behavioral elements such as tobacco and alcohol intake, viral infection is considered an important risk factor for the development of oral cancer that is often derived from premalignant or potential malignant lesions of the oral mucosa such as leukoplasia, erythroplasia, and oral lichen planus.
(ii) Bowen's disease and Erythroplasia of Queyrat are forms of SCC in situ that can sometimes develop into an invasive form.
Conditions such as leukoplakia, [15] erythroplasia of Queyrat, [16] Bowen's disease, [17] and Paget's disease [18] are considered to be precancerous lesions.
This term is used for lesions that occur on the shaft and are not as grossly red as erythroplasia of Queyrat.
Terms that were not recommended "because of the confusion associated with the use" included Bowen disease, erythroplasia of Queyrat, carcinoma simplex, and leukoplakic vulvitis.
Dysplasia, erythroplasia, leukoplasia, lymphomatoid granulomatosis and papulosis, preleukemia and xeroderma pigmetosum are all conditions which, if left untreated, may lead to cancer.
In early stages, lesions generally appear either reddish (erythroplasia) or whitish (leukoplakia) in color.
The most serious oral condition is erythroplakia, also called erythroplasia. The red, velvety patch associated with this condition occurs equally in men and women and develops most often in persons 60 to 70 years of age.
The most frequent premalignant lesions which can progress to OSCC are oral leukoplakia (OLK), oral lichen planus (OLP), and erythroplasia [5, 9].