erythrokinetics

erythrokinetics

 [ĕ-rith″ro-ki-net´iks]
the kinetics of erythrocytes, described by laboratory measurements of total red cell volume, rate of red cell production, and red cell life-span (rate of destruction).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ryth·ro·ki·net·ics

(ĕ-rith'rō-ki-net'iks),
A consideration of the kinetics of erythrocytes from their generation to destruction; erythrokinetic studies are sometimes made in cases of anemia to evaluate the balance between erythrocyte production and destruction.
[erythro- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

e·ryth·ro·ki·net·ics

(ĕ-rith'rō-ki-net'iks)
The kinetics of erythrocytes from their generation to destruction.
[erythro- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A correlation of erythrokinetics, ineffective erythropoiesis, and erythroid precursor apoptosis in Thai patients with thalassemia.
[43.] Saad AM, Hussein MF, Bushara HO, Dargie JD, Taylor MG (1984) Erythrokinetics and albumin metabolism in primary experimental Schistosoma bovis infections in Zebu calves.
Understanding the processes of erythrokinetics (including pharmaeokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ESAs) will assist nurses in better managing the anemia seen in our patients.
The variability in Hb levels among patients on dialysis has been explained by the erythrokinetic model, which describes the production, accumulation, and destruction of RBCs over time (Kruse et al, 2008; Uehlinger, Gotch, & Sheiner, 1992).
Erythrokinetic Effect of Modifying Versus Holding Epoetin Alfa Doses
The erythrokinetic model illustrates why it is generally preferable to reduce rather than hold epoetin alfa doses.
The erythrokinetic effect of holding and restarting epoetin alfa doses can create a ping-pong effect on RBC production and death rates and on Hb levels (see Figure 2).