erythrogenic

erythrogenic

 [ĕ-rith″ro-jen´ik]
1. producing a sensation of red.
3. erythropoietic.

e·ryth·ro·gen·ic

(ĕ-rith'rō-jen'ik),
1. Producing red, as causing an eruption or a red color sensation.
2. Pertaining to the formation of red blood cells.
[erythro- + -gen, producing]

e·ryth·ro·gen·ic

(ĕ-rith'rō-jen'ik)
1. Producing red, as in causing an eruption or a red color sensation.
2. Pertaining to the formation of red blood cells.
[erythro- + -gen, producing]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, SDSE lack several virulence factors, such as a cysteine protease (designated erythrogenic toxin B); a hyaluronic acid capsule (hasA and hasB); and an inhibitor of complement activation (sic) (17), in addition to many superantigens (18,19).
staphylococcal toxic shock toxin, streptococcal erythrogenic toxin), viruses (Epstein-Barr virus, parvovirus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-2) or ubiquitous microorganisms that cause clinically manifested disease in genetically predisposed individuals.
exotoxins, such as pyrogenic (erythrogenic) toxin, which causes the rash of scarlet fever and systemic toxic shock syndrome (See http://textbookofbacteriology.net/themicrobialworld/strep.html.)
Nucleotide sequence of the type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin) gene from Streptococcus pyogenes bacteriophage T12.
Cavaillon, "Comparative study of cytokine release by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with Streptococcus pyogenes superantigenic erythrogenic toxins, heat-killed streptococci, and lipopolysaccharide," Infection and Immunity, vol.
The gene for type A streptococcal exotoxin (erythrogenic toxin) is located in bacteriophage T12.
Since PV-B19 is a hematopoietic, principally an erythrogenic virus, anemia is the most frequent hematologic finding of PV infection.
Examples of lysogenic conversion occurs in certain strains of Streptococcus pyogenes carrying a prophage capable of producing erythrogenic toxin (the toxin that causes scarlet fever) and certain strains of Vibrio cholerae that carry a prophage that can produce cholera toxin.
Barium, Be, Co, and Sr depletion result in depressed growth, reduced calcification of bones and teeth, and even evidence of hypoplasia within erythrogenic tissue and bone marrow (Underwood 1971, Curzon 1983a, d).
Scarlet fever is caused by circulating erythrogenic toxin that is produced by group A hemolytic Streptococcus and in fewer instances, certain strains of staphylococcus (Graham & Uphold, 1994).

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