erythroderma


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erythroderma

 [ĕ-rith″ro-der´mah]
abnormal redness of the skin over widespread areas of the body.
congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma a generalized hereditary dermatitis with scaling, occurring in a bullous form (epidermolytic hyperkeratosis) and a nonbullous form (lamellar ichthyosis).
erythroderma desquamati´vum Leiner's disease.
psoriatic erythroderma a generalized psoriasis vulgaris, showing the chemical characteristics of exfoliative dermatitis.

e·ryth·ro·der·ma

(ĕ-rith'rō-der'mă), Do not confuse this word with erythredema.
A nonspecific designation for intense and usually widespread reddening of the skin from dilation of blood vessels, often preceding, or associated with exfoliation.
Synonym(s): erythrodermatitis
[erythro- + G. derma, skin]
Reddened skin of any cause
Aetiology Intoxication by boric acid, carbon monoxide, cyanide, atropine, scopolamine

e·ryth·ro·der·ma

, erythrodermia (ĕ-rith'rō-dĕr'mă, -mē'ă)
A nonspecific designation for intense and usually widespread reddening of the skin from dilatation of blood vessels, often preceding, or associated with exfoliation.
Synonym(s): erythrodermatitis.
[erythro- + G. derma, skin]

erythroderma

, erythrodermia (e-rith?ro-der'ma) (e-rith?ro-der'me-a) [? + derma, skin]
Enlarge picture
ERYTHRODERMA
Abnormally widespread redness and scaling of the skin, sometimes involving the entire body. This condition may be seen in patients with extensive psoriasis, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, drug reactions, seborrheic or atopic dermatitis, or other conditions. See: illustration Synonym: erythrodermia; exfoliative dermatitis

erythroderma desquamativum

A disease of breast-fed infants. Resembling seborrhea, it is characterized by redness of the skin and development of scales.

erythroderma ichthyosiforme congenitum

The Latin name for congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma.

Erythroderma

An abnormal reddening of the entire skin surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
Erythroderma is a rare exfoliative skin disorder, the true incidence of which remains unknown.
Clinically, it is difficult to discern the difference between HCQ-induced psoriasis-like erythroderma and drug-induced hypersensitivity.
There is conflicting evidence regarding prognosis of erythroderma in developing nations.
Concurrently, microscopically, his hair exhibited the typical bamboo hair appearance gradually and erythroderma resolved with the restricted diet.
TCR gene rearrangement studies are particularly important in working up recalcitrant erythroderma in a palmoplantar distribution.
In the present case, although the child had erythroderma and desquamation shortly after birth, the diagnosis of Netherton was overlooked because there was no family history of the syndrome and the hair was not affected in early infancy and the fact that hair may be sparse in healthy infants in the first few months of life.
The skin manifestations of DIHS are maculopapular rash, erythema multiforme, exfoliative dermatitis, acute generalized exanthematous pustular dermatosis-like eruption, and erythroderma [1-4].
PRP can be confused with other causes of erythroderma
During the first 48 hours of therapy diffuse erythroderma with purpura and petechiae appeared, while the right leg became livid, and bullae appeared in places subjected to external pressure (Figure 1).
However, the treatment had no effect on erythroderma [4].
TABLE Differential Diagnosis of Atopic Dermatitis Autosomal recessive hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome (AR-HIES) Benign cephalic histiocytosis Contact dermatitis (irritant or allergic; consider bathing products, moisturizers) Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma Immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome Langerhans cell histiocytosis Netherton syndrome (severe erythroderma, failure to thrive) Nummular dermatitis Psoriasis (rash in napkin distribution, which is not typical for atopic dermatitis) Pediatric herpes simplex virus infection Scabies (papular and nodular, affecting palm and sole) Seborrheic dermatitis Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) Staphylococcus aureus infection Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (bleeding disorder, low platelet count) Zinc deficiency
TABLE Differential Diagnosis of Atopic Dermatitis Autosomal recessive hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome (AR-HIES) Benign cephalic histiocytosis Contact dermatitis (irritant or allergic; consider bathing products, moisturizers) Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma Immunodysregulafion, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome Langerhans cell histiocytosis Netherton syndrome (severe erythroderma, failure to thrive) Nummular dermatitis Psoriasis (rash in napkin distribution, which is not typical for atopic dermatitis) Pediatric herpes simplex virus infection Scabies (papular and nodular, affecting palm and sole) Seborrheic dermatitis Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) Staphylococcus aureus infection Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (bleeding disorder, low platelet count) Zinc deficiency